SGI Techpubs Library

IRIX 6.5  »  Product Release Notes / Information
find in page | jump to first hit | clear highlight

dmedia_eoe

  Introduction
  Installation Information
  Audio I/O System
  Audio Control Panel
  SoundScheme
  CD Audio Support
  DAT Audio Support
  MIDI System
  Software MIDI Synthesizer
  Synthesizer Panel
  Video I/O System
  Video Panel
  Audio/Video Compression
  Supported Media File Formats
  Digital Media DSO's
  Digital Media Commands
  Media Player Tool
  Media Recorder Tool
  Movie Maker Tool
  Media Convert Tool
  Sound Player Tool
  Sound Editor Tool
  CD Player Tool
  DAT Manager Tool
  MIDI Keyboard Tool
  Compression Viewer Tool
  Sound Track Audio Tool
  Sample Sound, Movie, and Music Files
  Recipes
  FX Builder Tool
  Disk Striping and Performance Testing Utilities
  Synthesizer Editor


Introduction 1. Introduction The IRIS Digital Media Execution Environment contains the basic system components necessary to support audio, MIDI, video applications on an IRIS workstation. Note: Packaged with your software is a separate sheet that contains the Software License Agreement. This software is provided to you solely under the terms and conditions of the Software License Agreement. Please take a few moments to review the Agreement. This document contains the following chapters: 1. Introduction 2. Installation Information 3. Digital Audio I/O System 4. Audio Panel 5. SoundScheme 6. CD Audio Support 7. DAT Audio Support 8. MIDI System 9. Software MIDI Synthesizer 10. Synthesizer Panel 11. Digital Video I/O System 12. Video Panel 13. Audio/Video Compression 14. Supported Media File Formats 15. Digital Media DSO's 16. Digital Media Commands 17. Media Player Tool 18. Media Recorder Tool 19. Media Maker Tool 20. Media Convert Tool 21. Sound Player Tool 22. Sound Editor Tool 23. CD Player Tool 24. DAT Manager Tool 25. MIDI Keyboard Tool 26. Compression Viewer Tool 27. Sound Track Tool 28. Sample Sound, Movie, and Music Files 29. Recipes 30. FX Builder Tool 31. Disk Striping and Performance Testing Utilities 32. Synthesizer Editor Tool 1.1 Release Identification Information Following is the release identification information for the IRIS Digital Media Execution Environment: Software Product dmedia_eoe Version 6.5 System Software Requirements IRIX 6.5 1.2 Online Release Notes After you install the online release notes for a product (the relnotes subsystem), you can view the release notes on your screen. Note: You can read the online release notes for most products before installing the software. Refer to the booklet in your CD-ROM case for more information. If you have a graphics system, select ``Release Notes'' from the Tools submenu of the Toolchest. This displays the grelnotes(1) graphical browser for the online release notes. Refer to the grelnotes(1) man page for information on options to this command. If you do not have a graphics system, you can use the relnotes command. Refer to the relnotes(1) man page for accessing the online release notes. 1.3 Product Support Silicon Graphics, Inc., provides a comprehensive product support maintenance program for its products. If you are in the U.S. or Canada and would like support for your Silicon Graphics-supported products, contact the Technical Assistance Center at (800)800-4SGI. If you are outside these areas, contact the Silicon Graphics subsidiary or authorized distributor in your country.
back to top

Installation Information 2. Installation Information This chapter lists information that is supplemental to the Software Installation Administrator's Guide and the installation instructions in the Personal System Administration Guide. The information listed here is product-specific; use it with either of those Guides to install this product. 2.1 IRIS Digital Media Execution Environment Subsystems IRIS Digital Media Execution Environment includes these subsystems: dmedia_eoe.books.MediaTls_UG Insight on-line digital media tools user's guide and help information. dmedia_eoe.books.FXBuilder_Help Insight on-line help information for FXBuilder. dmedia_eoe.data.moremovies Sample MPEG-1 systems bitstream file. dmedia_eoe.data.movies Sample movie files. dmedia_eoe.data.music Sample MIDI files. dmedia_eoe.data.prosonus Sample sound files. dmedia_eoe.data.soundscheme SoundScheme desktop sound server data files. dmedia_eoe.data.synth General MIDI sound set for use with the software synthesizer. dmedia_eoe.man.pages Manual pages for digital media execution environment. dmedia_eoe.man.relnotes Release notes for digital media execution environment. dmedia_eoe.sw.audio Base digital audio execution environment including audio kernel software and Audio Library runtime libraries for o32, n32, and 64-bit applications. dmedia_eoe.sw.base Base digital media execution environment including systems software for built-in video I/O and compression devices, MIDI systems software, the SoundScheme desktop sound server, digital media file type rules, and digital media command-line utilities. dmedia_eoe.sw.lib Digital media runtime libraries for o32 executables. dmedia_eoe.sw.plugins Effects plug-in software for o32 digital media applications. dmedia_eoe.sw.synth Software audio synthesizer. dmedia_eoe.sw.tools Digital media graphical user interface tools. dmedia_eoe.sw32.lib Digital media runtime libraries for n32 executables. dmedia_eoe.sw.plugins Effects plug-in software for n32 digital media applications. 2.2 IRIS Digital Media Execution Environment Subsystem Disk Space Requirements This section lists the subsystems (and their sizes) of the IRIS Digital Media Execution Environment. You can use the software installation instructions in the Personal System Administration Guide to install this product. If you are installing this software for the first time, the default subsystems are installed if you click the Install Automatically button. To install a different set of subsystems, click the Customize Installation button and make your new selections. Then click the Start button to launch the installation. Note: The listed subsystem sizes are approximate. Refer to the Software Installation Administrator's Guide for information on finding exact sizes. Subsystem Name Subsystem Size (512-byte blocks) dmedia_eoe.books.FXbuilder_Help (default) 1062 dmedia_eoe.books.MediaTls_UG (default) 14140 dmedia_eoe.data.moremovies 20000 dmedia_eoe.data.movies (default) 1663 dmedia_eoe.data.music 689 dmedia_eoe.data.prosonus 21927 dmedia_eoe.data.soundscheme (default) 4986 dmedia_eoe.data.synth 56793 dmedia_eoe.man.pages (default) 536 dmedia_eoe.man.relnotes (default) 204 dmedia_eoe.sw.audio (default) 1358 dmedia_eoe.sw.base (default) 9920 dmedia_eoe.sw.lib (default) 17248 dmedia_eoe.sw.plugins (default) 16860 dmedia_eoe.sw.synth (default) 2272 dmedia_eoe.sw.tools (default) 18581 dmedia_eoe.sw32.lib (default) 28764 dmedia_eoe.sw32.plugins (default) 1509 2.3 Installation Method This section lists the installation method for the IRIS Digital Media Execution Environment subsystems. Refer to the Software Installation Administrator's Guide for complete installation instructions. Subsystem Name Method of Installation dmedia_eoe.books.FXbuilder_Help IRIX dmedia_eoe.books.MediaTls_UG IRIX dmedia_eoe.data.moremovies IRIX dmedia_eoe.data.movies IRIX dmedia_eoe.data.music IRIX dmedia_eoe.data.prosonus IRIX dmedia_eoe.data.soundscheme IRIX dmedia_eoe.data.synth IRIX dmedia_eoe.man.pages IRIX dmedia_eoe.man.relnotes IRIX dmedia_eoe.sw.audio Miniroot dmedia_eoe.sw.base Miniroot dmedia_eoe.sw.lib IRIX dmedia_eoe.sw.plugins IRIX dmedia_eoe.sw.synth IRIX dmedia_eoe.sw.tools IRIX dmedia_eoe.sw32.lib IRIX dmedia_eoe.sw32.plugins IRIX
back to top

Audio I/O System 3. Audio I/O System An audio I/O system is included with most Silicon Graphics workstations, including Indy, Indigo2, Onyx2, OCTANE, and O2. Audio is an optional feature available for Origin, Onyx, Challenge and Power Challenge machines. This section details the changes, known bugs, and caveats in the audio system itself. See other sections of these release notes for information on sound utility commands and graphical user interface tools for recording, editing, and playback, as well as CD audio, DAT audio, sound synthesis, and other features. The audio execution environment dmedia_eoe.sw.audio includes basic kernel software to support SGI audio I/O devices as well as o32, n32, and 64-bit versions of the Audio Library DSO, libaudio.so. The Digital Media Tools image (dmedia_eoe.sw.tools) contains most of the audio tools, such as apanel(1) and soundplayer(1). 3.1 Changes and Additions This section describes changes/additions to the audio I/O system between the IRIX 6.2 and IRIX 6.5 releases. The audio system provided with all OCTANE and Onyx2 systems supports a new eight-channel digital audio ADAT interface. This is in addition to the analog and two-channel digital audio interfaces as provided in previous workstations. The audio system also supports a Professional Digital Audio Option, which has additional ADAT and AES I/O. The audio system in IRIX 6.3, IRIX 6.4, and IRIX 6.5 is based on a new Audio Library (2.0) which supports multiple audio I/O devices in a single system. + The audio system now supports multiple audio devices. On systems which have more than one independent input and output, you can now select the audio devices you wish your applications to use. Applications can use multiple devices simultaneously. + The audio system now supports a wider variety of audio devices. Some of the new devices include the 8-channel ADAT I/O and the 16-channel SMPTE 272M digital I/O on the DIVO video option for Onyx2. + The audio system supports sample rates that are slaved to video sources. Only some devices support this; look under "Preferences" for the device in the Audio Control Panel. + The microphone and line-input gains are now independent. This means you seldom need to adjust the input gain when you change input sources. Now when you select a new input source, the gain will automatically revert to its value when that source was previously selected. + The audio system now provides support for reading and writing digital audio subcode. You can select consumer-mode or professional-mode subcode on the AES digital output using the Audio Control Panel. This allows the AES output to work with a wider variety of devices, since some devices require a particular kind of subcode. + The Audio Control Panel has been generalized to support multiple audio I/O devices. See the "Audio Control Panel" chapter of these release notes for more information. + The Audio Library is now a DSO rather than a statically linked library. Applications which were linked with libaudio.a (in releases prior to IRIX 6.3) will continue to function properly on IRIX 6.5. + Indigo R4000 (IP20) has full support for AL 2.0, including features previously available on that machine under AL 1.0, such as precise synchronization support. Correctly written AL 2.0 applications will now work across all supported IRIX 6.5 configurations. 3.2 Bug Fixes This section lists the audio system bugs fixed in IRIX 6.5. + A problem existed in IRIX 6.2 where a rare race- condition could panic the system if a multi-process application closed an audio port in one process while it attempted to use the port in another process. (SCR 334606) + Prior to IRIX 6.5, there was no way to choose between consumer-mode and professional-mode subcode on AES output. This caused the AES output to fail with some devices requiring a particular subcode format. (SCR 578672). + On O2 only, there was a chip bug which, under extremely rare circumstances, could cause data corruption. This has been worked around (SCR 568567 and 568568). 3.3 Caveats + On Onyx2, OCTANE, or with the PCI digital audio option, some digital audio devices which use S/PDIF ("consumer") signals (.5V peak-to- peak) may not work reliably with the AES digital input. This input primarily supports AES-3id signals (1V peak-to-peak). + On Onyx2, OCTANE, or with the PCI digital audio option, the audio software currently supports both AES3 ("professional") subcode format and S/PDIF ("consumer") subcode on the AES digital output. Some devices may only work with one or the other format. If you have difficulty getting the output to work with some device, try switching the subcode format. You can do this using apanel by selecting "preferences" for the AES Out device. Note that the AES digital input accepts either subcode format. + The Onyx2, OCTANE, and O2 systems do not support four- channel analog mode. They do however support eight- channel digital audio I/O (O2 requires the PCI Professional Audio Option) and have compatibility so that programs that ask for four-channel ports will use the first four channels of the eight-channel ADAT port. + On Onyx2, OCTANE, and O2 systems, the audio panel application (apanel) can display the rate of the AES digital input. However, the display will be invalid after rebooting the system until audio is started for the first time. Likewise, applications which query the digital input sample rate will receive invalid results until audio is first started. The workaround is to start (and optionally then stop) audio before using the digital input rate. This can be accomplished, for example, by briefly enabling a "Meter" in apanel. + On Onyx2, when using video locking, only "NTSC" (525/59.94) and "PAL" (625/50) timings are supported. The audio software switches between them automatically. If an invalid video signal is present, lock will be lost and the device will revert to its nominal rate. + On Onyx2, video lock will not work after rebooting the system until audio is started for the first time. This particularly affects AES and ADAT digital outputs: while these output can be used as clock inputs to other devices even when audio is not running, these output's sample rates will not be locked to video until audio is started for the first time. + In some systems including Indy, Indigo2 and Audio/Serial Option, the digital input could be used to monitor or record the output of audio applications when nothing was plugged into the digital I/O jack. You will need an external loopback cable to accomplish this on Onyx2, OCTANE, and O2, because the jacks are physically separated. + The O2 system does not have a built-in digital I/O jack. In some systems, the digital input could be used to monitor or record the output of audio applications when nothing was plugged into the digital I/O jack. This feature does not work on O2 without the PCI Professional Audio Option, which includes digital I/O. + The O2 audio system contains two independent digital- to-analog converters (DACs). Device "AnalogOut" represents the DAC that drives the internal speaker, headphone output, and the line-out connectors on the side panel of the system. The volume buttons will affect the gain on this device, including line-out. Device "AnalogOut2" represents the DAC that drives the line-out connectors on the rear panel of the system. The volume buttons do not affect gain on "AnalogOut2". Audio signals played through one device will not be heard on the other. For example, audio sent to device "AnalogOut2" will not be heard on the internal speaker, the headphones, or the line-out connectors on the system side panel. A method for connecting multiple devices together at the system level is planned for a subsequent release.
back to top

Audio Control Panel 4. Audio Control Panel Audio Control Panel (invoked from the command line as audiopanel(1)) provides a graphical user interface and command line interface for controlling and monitoring audio I/O device parameters. 4.1 Changes and Additions This section lists changes/additions to the Audio Control Panel between the IRIX 6.2 and IRIX 6.4 releases. IRIX 6.4 continues use of the new, generalized version of the Audio Control Panel first included with IRIX 6.2, which has been designed to accommodate multiple audio I/O devices installed in the same system: + With the new requirement of having to manage multiple input and output devices, audiopanel's menu bar structure changed. Previously, the Input and Rate had their own top-level menus. Now, before adjusting the input source or sample rate for a particular device, the device must first be selected by clicking the right mouse button over a device panel. After the selection is made, the Selected menu contains submenus for modifying Input Source and Sample Rate. Availability of these submenus and/or entries on these submenus will vary depending on which device is currently selected. + The Options menu selection for Input (or Output) Sliders Independent has now moved to the Selected menu under the toggle entry Group Sliders. Audiopanel keeps track of the slider grouping status for each device independently. + For Indigo2 and Indy machines, the toggling of four- channel mode and stereo microphone as previously done in the Options menu. These functions have been moved to the Device Preferences Dialog for the AnalogIn device, This dialog can be reached by first selecting the AnalogIn device, then by choosing the Preferences... option in the Selected top-level menu. + Previous incarnations of audiopanel had a choice of a Digital Input in the Input source menu for Indy, Indigo2 and the Onyx Audio/Serial Option. Under the new audio architecture, the input source Digital Input is now handled as its own device, called Digital In , which is independent of the Analog In device. Setting the default input to the Digital In device on these machines will provide the same functionality as switching the previous audiopanel's input source to Digital In. + Previous incarnations of audiopanel had a Use Input Rate option as part of the output sample rate menu. Unfortunately, this convenience feature is not available in this newer version of audiopanel. + Previous incarnations of audiopanel had a Digital Input choice for output sample rates device by setting its sync source to AES In and matching its sample rate to the Digital In (or AES In ) device on the same audio subsystem. + It should be noted that digital output devices have no sliders to control gain and no signal meters, because gain control and signal monitoring on these devices is unsupported. A blank looking control panel for a digital output device is completely normal. Sample rates and input sources are still modifyable as they are appropriate for the device. + Audio controls for the Presenter Flat Panel display are no longer relegated to a separate window. Presenter Controls will now appear alongside those of the appropriate baseline Analog Out device on the system. + Normally, all outputs interfaces for a particular audio output device are active. If an output device supports the choice of directing output to a single output interface, the device's popup menu and Selected menu will have an additional Output Destination Menu, akin to the Input Source, allowing the user to select which output is to be active. 4.2 Bug Fixes + BUG 458608 - The apanel Selected->Make Default menu would give all the user interface indications that the Default Device was changed, however, with the insidious little side effect of not actually telling the audio system to change the Default Device. + BUG 469264 - Apanel's Device List panel would not always be able to accommodate long device names, especially those with subsystem names prepended. The Device List now is sized accordingly. + BUG 437617 - Apanel's command line would not accept fully qualified or typed names of audio resources (such as "RAD1.AES In" or "A3.Microphone", etc.). The command line can now handle the much more robust references that alGetResourceByName() provides. + BUG 415586 - Subsystem names now appear on sync sources when its appropriate to distinguish between similarly named, but distinct time bases. + BUG 423362 - Apanel would not recognize user-interface oriented command-line and resource file settings specified for default devices. Examples were -meteron -meteroff and resources effecting filter operations of the meters. + BUG 475753 - Apanel meters on digital devices no longer use a DC filter by default. Analog devices, however, still use a DC filter by default. + BUG 483191 - With DC filtering off, apanel's right meter would not always display correct information (only when the device was a stereo device). + BUG 481235 - Apanel's File->Revert menu would not turn the audio system back to its factory settings as indicated in the help. Now it does. 4.3 Known Problems and Workarounds + The minimum input slider position does not correspond to infinite attenuation on Indy and Indigo2. This is an audio hardware limitation. . The In-Use indicator on the title bar for each device is known to not switch on or off correctly when the Default Output is changed. Restarting audiopanel has been known to clear up the problem. + Presenter gain controls are operable only when the device's sliders are ungrouped. Tone controls currently don't work just yet. + If a data file is opened for recovering audiopanel layout and system state that is invalid, the device panels currently in view will disappear. They can be restored by re-selecting them through the View pane.
back to top

SoundScheme 5. SoundScheme soundscheme is an X-based server daemon which provides high-level audio playback services for applications. Based on the audio and audiofile libraries, soundscheme mixes and plays sounds on demand as requested by multiple client programs using a single audio port. Each client may provide an X resource file which specifies a palette of sound names and the mappings of these names to soundfiles. Named sounds are activated within applications using function calls from the server's client library. The soundscheme server is started automatically at login from the Xsession file for SGI's IRIX Interactive Desktop(TM) user environment. A few sounds are assigned to system events (such as launching applications, dropping file icons and searching for items in the system). There are no interface tools at this time for user customization of sounds. However, knowledgeable users may edit *.soundfile resource items in the client resource files to assign different soundfiles to defined events. The system default client resource files are located at the following path: /usr/share/data/sounds/soundscheme/schemes Soundfiles referenced within the system default resource files should be placed at: /usr/share/data/sounds/soundscheme/soundfiles Soundfiles to be used by SoundScheme must be in AIFF-C format and recorded at 44.1kHz sampling rate. The sound server will ignore files that do not meet these requirements. In IRIX 6.4 and previous releases, root access was required to create custom sounds. The user would have to edit the defaultScheme.ss client resource file, and the sound changes affected the whole system for all users. In IRIX 6.5, users familiar with X resource files can create custom sounds and put them into effect only for their own login session, and root access is not required. The output level (volume) of SoundScheme sounds may not be changed independently of the system-wide audio level. Altering the system audio level via apanel (audio control panel) will affect the SoundScheme level as well. The SoundScheme sounds may be disabled by using the IRIX Interactive Desktop Sounds panel provided for customization of the user's environment. This panel contains a Desktop Sounds checkbox used to set the enabled or disabled status for SoundScheme. Changed settings take immediate effect for some applications; other applications won't pick up the change until the next login. Note that this toggle does not kill the soundscheme process itself, but rather shuts off the desktop requests to SoundScheme. In IRIX 6.5, the user can also use the Sounds panel to redirect SoundScheme sounds to a different audio output device, such as the rear analog-out jacks on an O2, instead of to the Default audio output device, which is typically the headphones and speakers. To disable the SoundScheme server daemon from starting up at all, use chkconfig to set 'soundscheme off'. In this case, the change will not take effect until the system is restarted. The version of SoundScheme included in the IRIX 6.4 release is the same as the version included with the 5.3 release. The IRIX 6.5 SoundScheme has changed since IRIX 6.4. 5.1 Changes and Additions to IRIX 6.5 SoundScheme + A possible security vulnerability was removed. + A new allowOverlap resource will, if set to true for a given sound, allow soundscheme to start playing the sound again even if it is already playing. This was introduced to allow dynamic audio feedback for the "type to select" feature in the IRIX Interactive Desktop. + The audio output device can now be changed dynamically. + In IRIX 6.5, SoundScheme accepts a -aux filename command-line option that makes it load an auxiliary scheme database to override sounds defined in the /usr/share/data/sounds/soundscheme/schemes/defaultScheme.ss soundscheme. This allows users to change sounds without having root access. To hear customized sounds, users who create their own soundscheme must kill soundscheme, then restart it using the -aux filename option where filename is the name of their soundscheme. To have their sounds remembered across logins, users can copy the /var/X11/xdm/Xsession.dt file to their home directory as $HOME/.xsession, then edit the copy and add the -aux filename option to the soundscheme startup line. Users must exercise caution, as the $HOME/.xession file will run instead of the system /var/X11/xdm/Xsession.dt file, and errors in the $HOME/.xsession file can prevent the user from logging in at the console. Here is an example personal soundscheme file: *soundPalette: Warning *Warning.soundfile: 08.ting.aifc *Warning.label: Warning The above file, when used as an auxiliary soundscheme, will cause a triangle sound to play when a new file icon appears on the desktop instead of the default piano sound. Other desktop sounds will remain unaffected (ex., the sand shifting sound will still play when the user moves an icon on the background). + These old SoundScheme message types which were implemented previously as simple no-op placeholders are now no longer supported: create, destroy, start, stop, set, get, query, and enable. + The ssplay utility program now accepts a -o command- line option for setting and querying the current SoundScheme audio output device.
back to top

CD Audio Support 6. CD Audio Support This section describes changes, bug fixes, known problems, and known documentation errors relating to the audio capabilities of the SCSI CD-ROM drive. Starting with IRIX 6.3, The Digital Media Execution Environment subsystem for 6.5 (dmedia_eoe.sw.tools) includes the program cdplayer(1), which provides a number of improvements over its predecessor, cdman. Cdplayer uses the standard digital media look-and-feel and provides much more extensive facilities for moving between tracks and for copying digital audio from CD tracks to sound files on disk. The program formerly known as cdplayer has been renamed cdheadphone and resides in /usr/bin/X11. 6.1 Known Problems and Workarounds + Cdplayer doesn't handle slower CD-ROM drives well. In particular, when playing off of a 1x or 2x CD-ROM cdplayer will sometimes let the audio ring buffer underflow, resulting in audible clicks. This is not a problem on Onyx2 and O2 system CD-ROMs.
back to top

DAT Audio Support 7. DAT Audio Support This section describes changes, bug fixes, known problems, and known documentation errors relating to the audio capabilities of the SCSI DDS drive for IRIX workstations. Starting with IRIX 6.3, subsystem dmedia_eoe.sw.tools includes a new DAT playback/capture program called datplayer. Datplayer provides a transport control panel interface to the audio capabilities of a DAT tape drive include a track scanning mechanism and convenient audio capture utilities. It also provides a facility for building a database of the contents of a tape, so that the tape's tracks may be listed by name. Datplayer does not have any recording capabilities. Users can master DAT tapes by using the Export file menu option in SoundTrack. Datplayer does not replace the application datman since datman is currently the only way to "spot record" onto DAT tapes. PLEASE NOTE that as of 6.5, DAT audio is no longer officially supported. 7.1 Changes and Additions + We have added support for DDS3 drives from Sony. These drives have excellent audio capabilities without the firmware problems exhibited in older drives. 7.2 Known Problems and Workarounds There are a number of firmware problems with the older DDS2 drives. They are also very sensitive to tape residue. We strongly recommend frequent cleaning and the use of new tape when possible (particularly for mastering). + Please note that datplayer does not work reliably with the DDS2 drives. + DAT audio firmware problem: data tape at BOT. Assume a DDS (data) tape (ie, a tape previously recorded in data mode) is inserted in the DAT drive. The drive will rewind the tape to logical BOT, which on a data tape is different than physical BOT. If you attempt to write audio data to the drive, it begins writing at logical BOT. When the tape is later re- inserted into the drive, it is incorrectly recognized as a data tape since DDS format data exists between physical BOT and logical BOT. Workaround: Check to see if the tape in the drive is DDS media and at BOT. If so, in audio mode write a frame of data to move the tape off logical BOT, then issue a rewind. This will cause the tape to rewind back to physical BOT. + DAT audio firmware problem: read position bug. The DAT drive firmware incorrectly returns its position via the MTGETAUDIO ioctl to the IRIX tape driver. There are two modes to this behavior. + Immediately following a seek: Suppose you seek by A-time (absolute time). Then MTGETAUDIO returns the correct A-time, but incorrect P-time (program time). Suppose you seek by P-time. Then MTGETAUDIO returns the correct P-time, but incorrect A-time. + Following a read or write: Both A-time and P-time are wrong. Workaround: Read a frame from the tape and decode the subcode information. This of course moves the tape, so you may have to seek back to the previous location or otherwise account for the resulting 1 frame difference between the frame read and the new tape position. + DAT audio firmware problem: read delay bug. If not used for 60 seconds, the DAT drive unloads the tape from the heads. Once this happens, subsequent reads will fail. Workaround: Avoid 60 second delays between subsequent operations. + Write following read: A write following a read is not frame-accurate. It may go onto the tape several frames too early, overwriting some of the data just read. Workaround: None (because of the following bug). + DAT audio firmware problem: Write following seek. A write following a seek is not frame-accurate. About 50% of the time, a write following a seek will go onto the tape a few frames early. Workaround: None.
back to top

MIDI System 8. MIDI System The MIDI execution environment consists of the kernel MIDI driver, the MIDI library DSO libmd.so, and the startmidi(1) and stopmidi(1) commands. The MIDI library DSO is installed from the subsystem dmedia_eoe.sw.lib (or dmedia_eoe.sw32.lib for n32 applications). The other core MIDI execution environment components are installed from the subsystem dmedia_eoe.sw.base. The MIDI driver allows applications programs to read or send time-stamped MIDI events via one or both of the serial ports on an Onyx2, Indy, Power Indigo2, Indigo2, or Indigo, workstation. The MIDI library provides an application programming interface to the capabilities of the driver. In order to operate a serial port on your IRIS workstation as a MIDI port, you must first connect it to a standard Apple Macintosh-compatible serial-to-MIDI interface, such as the Opcode Translator ProSync(tm). Many of these interfaces offer additional useful features, such as SMPTE time-code conversion. Before any MIDI applications can use the serial port, it is usually necessary to configure the serial ports for use with MIDI. This is done through the System Manager Port Tool. Bring up the Port Tool, and connect the desired serial port to a MIDI device. To use the port for other devices (such as a printer), simply disconnect the port using the Port Tool, and then connect to whatever device you desire. The name of the MIDI port will be "midiPortX", depending upon which serial port you connect to. The MIDI subsystem in IRIS Digital Media Execution Environment 6.4 is the same as the version included in the 6.2 release. 8.1 Known Problems and Workarounds + On Onyx2, the Port Tool can not be used to configure serial ports for MIDI. Instead, startmidi(1) must be run manually. For example, to use serial port 3 for MIDI, run startmidi -n ttyMidi3 -s 31250 -d /dev/ttyd3 + External MIDI converter boxes that draw power from the SGI workstation's serial port (rather than from an AC adapter) may not work reliably. + MIDI I/O through the serial ports on an O2 workstation is not a supported feature at this time. Work is underway to provide this feature via a patch in the future. Internal (interprocess) MIDI is supported on O2 systems. + Machines have been observed to crash as a consequence of changing the physical location of cables while MIDI is running. It is recommended that changes to the cabling of MIDI only be done while the machine is powered down. + Currently, the MIDI system does not automatically synchronize to an external sequencer or drum machine, nor does it generate MIDI clocks to synchronize other devices. + Some Indigo^2 machines exhibit erratic behavior when receiving system exclusive messages. If you have a problem, please contact the TAC (800.800.4SGI).
back to top

Software MIDI Synthesizer 9. Software MIDI Synthesizer The software wavetable MIDI synthesizer, midisynth, is a server daemon which provides MIDI wavetable synthesis services for applications. The MIDI synthesizer generates sounds on demand as requested by client programs using a single audio port, and it is started automatically on demand when a client MIDI application attempts to connect to it through a software MIDI port. The MIDI synthesizer is installed from the optional subsystem dmedia_eoe.sw.synth. To enable General MIDI synthesis, it is also necessary to install the subsystem dmedia_eoe.data.synth, which contains a full set of General MIDI presets for the synthesizer. These related tools are also included in dmedia_eoe.sw.synth: + Synthesizer Panel (synthpanel(1)), a graphical control panel for the software Synthesizer. See the "Synthesizer Panel" chapter in these release notes. + MIDI Keyboard (midikeys(1)), a "virtual" MIDI controller which may be used to control the internal software synthesizer or an external MIDI device. See the "MIDI Keyboard Tool" chapter in these release notes. + Synthesizer Editor (syntheditor(1)), a graphical preset/voice editor for the software Synthesizer. See the "Synthesizer Editor" chapter in these release notes. Sound Player (soundplayer(1)), installed from the dmedia_eoe.sw.tools subsystem, can be used to play back standard MIDI files along with the software synthesizer and General MIDI sample set. A collection of sample General MIDI compositions is included in the optional subsystem dmedia_eoe.data.music. These compositions are stored as Standard MIDI Files, and are installed in the directory /usr/share/data/music. Try loading them into Sound Player and playing them back using the internal software synthesizer. 9.1 Changes and Additions This section lists changes/additions to the MIDI synthesizer since the IRIX 6.3/6.4 PCI Audio Option support + general audio and MIDI synthesizer bug-fixes patch. + A chorus effects unit is now available, and both it and the reverb effects unit are now channel-specific. Channel levels are controlled via the EFFECTSLEVEL1 and EFFECTSLEVEL3 MIDI controller messages. The chorus type and settings may be set via synthpanel. + Preset and sample loading are now handled in a separate thread, so on-the-fly preset loads do not interrupt the playback of voices. + Voice limits may now be set on a preset-by-preset basis. This eliminated the problem of the percussion track monopolizing all the synthesizer voices, and made several other presets, such as the Acoustic Grand Piano, function more efficiently. + Reverb and Chorus are now on by default when running in General MIDI mode (the default). The default channel level for both effects is zero, though, so no effects will be heard unless 1) the MIDI file being played sets the effect levels (see above) or 2) the user sets a global reverb level for all channels using the Global Reverb Level slider in the synthpanel Run Time Parameters window (see the release notes for Synthesizer Panel). + Closely related to the previous item: Reverberation no longer "cuts out" when CPU usage reaches preset limit; CPU limiting is handled via voice stealing only. This section lists earlier changes/additions to the MIDI synthesizer made between the IRIX 6.3/6.4 release and the patch described above. + Preset bank files, specifically those in SoundFont2- compatible format, may now be loaded as alternates to the default General MIDI bank which comes with the distribution. Banks may be loaded via the Synthesizer Panel. These banks may also be specified and loaded as directories containing preset files which follow the midisynth GM filename system (see synthpreset(4) for details). + Now responds to GS bank-select messages, allowing the selection of GS preset variations (if available in the current bank) and selection of the various GS percussion banks. + Now handles Registered Program Numbers (RPN's) 0, 1, and 2 along with Data Entry MIDI messages. + Now handles combination presets with overlapping key and/or velocity ranges. + Many new preset parameters are available, including envelope attack and release time modulation and variable keyboard tuning. + Envelope generators may now have their gain modulated by other envelope generators or by control oscillators. + Now reports errors due to missing or unreadable bank files, preset files, sound files, and unknown parameters and illegal parameter values. These will be displayed by Synthesizer Panel, MIDI Keyboard, and/or Synthesizer Editor if any of these are running. + Up to 16 preset file names may be specified on the command line when starting midisynth by hand. + Synthesizer performance (measured by number of simultaneous voices) has been improved by about 40%. 9.2 Bug Fixes + Voice stealing now works without clicks, which also enables mono voice mode. + MIDI Channel volume and expression controller messages are now correctly mapped into the channel gain, as described in the MIDI spec. + LSB (Least Significant Byte) MIDI controllers are now handled (they were being ignored). + A Reset All Controllers MIDI message to a single channel now resets only that channel, as per the MIDI spec, and does not alter the volume, expression, or pan values. The All Notes Off and All Sound Off messages also now are channel- specific, as per the MIDI spec. + Continuous controllers (e.g., Modulation Wheel) now are scaled properly. Earlier versions were producing twice the expected modulation amount. + MIDI synthesizer now correctly handles the General MIDI Mode On/Off message. + Program changes now work on MIDI channel 10 (percussion channel) when in non-GM mode. + MIDI synthesizer now reports via the system log if the General MIDI preset file set or sound file set (installed from dmedia_eoe.data.synth are missing at startup time. + Multiple audio oscillators in a voice may now be enveloped separately. A bug had caused all oscillators to follow the first oscillator's envelope. + Envelope looping (forward, backward, or forward and backward) now work properly. + Low frequency control oscillator (LFO) frequencies are now not affected by pitch bend or master tune unless they are also tracking the keyboard. + Reverb unit now tracks the sampling rate setting. Before this, reverb times were distorted if sampling rates other than 44100 were used. + Many memory leaks fixed. 9.3 Known Problems and Workarounds + MIDI synthesizer has a tendency to use a lot of memory, often exceeding 15 Mb. Currently there is no way to recover/reduce this memory without killing and restarting the synth process. This workaround is the option currently available via the Synthezier Panel API. + The audio output of the MIDI synthesizer will occasionally break up when other uninterruptable processes (such as screen updates) compete for the CPU. This is best solved by running the synth at times when other CPU-intensive activities are not being run.
back to top

Synthesizer Panel 10. Synthesizer Panel The Synthesizer Panel (invoked from the command line as synthpanel(1)) provides a graphical control panel interface for monitoring the status of the software MIDI synthesizer, for manually changing preset banks and presets on each of its 16 channels, and for adjusting a number of its global and per-channel control parameters. It should be noted the the new 2.0 version of this application is not compatible with older versions of the MIDI synthesizer (see the release notes in Chapter 9). The new versions of both which are contained within this release should be used together. The MIDI synthesizer and its related applications, including this tool, are installed from the optional subsystem dmedia_eoe.sw.synth. To enable General MIDI synthesis, it is also necessary to install the subsystem dmedia_eoe.data.synth, which contains a full set of General MIDI presets for the synthesizer. 10.1 Changes and Additions This section lists changes/additions to Synthesizer Panel since the IRIX 6.3/6.4 PCI Audio Option support + general audio and MIDI synthesizer bug-fixes patch. + A new pop-up panel (invoked from the Options->Synth Startup Configuration... menu item) allows users to customize the software MIDI synthesizer's behavior via its startup file. This allows customizing of parameters such as the number of audio output channels, the audio output port, the maximum CPU usage, the default GM preset bank path, and several others. + The "Reverb + Tune" pop-up panel has been renamed "Run Time Parameters", and is invoked from the Options- >Synth Runtime Parameters... menu item. It now includes a set of controls for customizing the new MIDI synthesizer Chorus algorithm (see the release notes in Chapter 9). In addition, a new reverb control "Global Reverb Level" has been added to allow reverberation to be added to all midisynth channels. This was needed now that reverberation levels are set on a channel-by- channel basis using the standard GM/GS MIDI controllers. + A new Synth System Reset menu command has been added which allows you to reset midisynth to its startup state. This includes purging of all loaded preset banks, presets, and sample files. All subsequent file loads will reuse that memory space, preventing runaway growth of the midisynth processes. This section lists changes/additions to Synthesizer Panel between the IRIX 6.4/6.4 release and the above-mentioned patch. + A new panel has been added which contains eight drop pockets for specifying alternate preset banks to be used by the MIDI synthesizer. This panel is hidden by default, and may be displayed by pressing the "show banks" button. + The volume and expression display has been modified to match the new functionality: According to the MIDI specification, the total volume for a channel is determined by the formula: gain = (channel volume * expression) / (127 * 127). The old, incorrect formula added the two, limited the result to 127, then divided by 127. This caused most of the range to be unusable. + The preset display panel now displays the "Preset Name" field from the preset file, rather than creating a name by truncating the name of the preset file. This allows more elaborate preset names with embedded spaces, etc. 10.2 Bug Fixes + The General MIDI Preset Mode menu item now sends the correct MIDI message to any GM-compatible device. + All Notes Off, All Sound Off, and Reset All Controllers MIDI messages now generate a channel LED flash for only the channel on which they occur. Earlier versions flashed all channels. 10.3 Known Problems and Workarounds + If a preset bank file load fails for any reason, and no previous bank file had been loaded in the drop pocket, a "nonexistent file" icon (looks like an oval) will be left showing in the pocket. This is harmless, and should be ignored. + Whenever a preset is loaded from a preset bank file (such as a SoundFont2 bank) as opposed to from a bank directory, its icon will show as the "nonexistant file" image rather than the expected Synth Preset icon. This is also harmless.
back to top

Video I/O System 11. Video I/O System The Silicon Graphics Video Library is a device independent library for video devices on Silicon Graphics workstations equipped with video hardware. VL EOE is the first release of the execution environment and supports the built in video in Indy systems, as well as Galileo Video on Indigo2, Power Indigo2, and Indigo, and Indy Video on Indy. Future releases will support additional video devices. The execution environment for video includes the video daemon, a control panel, videopanel, that can be launched from the Icon Catalog, as well as videoin, an application that displays video in a window on the screen. On hardware options that support video output capabilities, the environment also includes videoout, an application that allows you to select a windowed area of the screen or the whole screen to send to video output connectors. There are also two command line applications, vidtomem and memtovid that support frame in from video and frame out to video. Documentation of these tools is included in the Utilities Guide. The Video Library Execution Environment subsystem in IRIS Digital Media Execution Environment 6.4 is the same as the 5.3 version. 11.1 Configuration Files The video devices have certain configuration values. There are factory defaults for each device stored in : /usr/etc/video/videod.defaults.device, where device is ev1 for Galileo Video and Indy Video, and vino for Indy VINO (Video In No Out). Using videopanel you can restore these, as well as saving and restoring a local configuration in /usr/etc/video/videod.defaults. 11.2 Known Problems and Workarounds + Not all applications follow default input. When using videopanel to set the default input, you may need to quit and restart the application if it is already running. + There is no concept of a default device in the current video environment. When you switch devices in the video control panel, there is no event sent to the application. It is up to the application to present a way to switch devices. This is only an issue for systems with multiple boards in them. + For certain monitors and timings you may want to use the setmon command. See the man page for details. 11.3 Changes and Additions + The Video Library Execution Environment subsystem in IRIS Digital Media Execution Environment 6.4 is the same as the 5.3 version. 11.4 Bug Fixes + XXX 11.5 Indy VINO Problems and Workarounds + When viewing video from an external source, if you fast forward or rewind the source, the videoin application can loose synchronization. Restart the application to regain a clean video signal. + If yo have an IndyCam and have not installed vino.sw.eoe or if you do not have the IndyCam plugged in when you boot your system, the hardware inventory command hinv reports: Vino video: unit 0, revision 0, Indycam not connected. Be sure to plug the IndyCam in before you start up your system. Once you install vino.sw.eoe. and reboot, your system will report correctly: Vino video: unit 0, revision 0, Indycam connected. + If the input video stream is frozen (by using Freeze on the videopanel) and the window is obscured and then uncovered, the video frame is not redrawn correctly. Unfreeze the video to have it redrawn. 11.6 Galileo Video and Indy Video Problems and Workarounds + If you resize the videoin application to it's minimum size, 96 x 72, you may see garbage lines on the bottom and the right edge of the image. + When using vidtomem to capture a burst of consecutive frames, you can only capture up to 4 at once. To capture more frames call vidtomem repeatedly. + There is one line of invalid data across the bottom of the videoin window using PAL format. + There may be one line of invalid data across the top and side of the videoout image. + Galileo Video on the Indigo platform will only work with the R4000 CPU using XS, XS24, XS24Z, XZ, and Elan level graphics. + Galileo Video on the Power Indigo2 platform will only work with the XZ and Elan level graphics. It will not work with the XL graphics. 11.7 Documentation Errors + There are no known errors in the documentation.
back to top

Video Panel 12. Video Panel The Video Control Panel (invoked from the command line as videopanel(1)) provides an easy-to-use graphical interface to control all the installed video hardware. It allows you to set various hardware parameters through various sliders, menus and pushbuttons in panels sorted by function.
back to top

Audio/Video Compression 13. Audio/Video Compression The Digital Media Execution Environment provides a set of software and hardware codecs for audio and video. The programming interfaces and compression manager software for software codecs and for memory-to-memory image compression/decompression using hardware acceleration (eg, the O2 image processing/compression engine) are included in the Digital Media Library, libdmedia.so. The programming interfaces for the Cosmo Compress and Impact Compress devices and for MPEG-1 video decompression are included in the older Compression Library, libcl.so. The dmedia_eoe.{sw,sw32}.lib subsystems contain o32 and n32 versions of the software image and audio codecs. The codecs themselves are installed as individual DSO's in the directories /usr/{lib,lib32}/dmedia/imageconverters and /usr/{lib,lib32}/dmedia/audioconverters. Runtime support for the realtime memory-to-memory motion JPEG encoder/decoder available for the O2 workstation is included in the dmedia_eoe.sw.base subsystem. Runtime support for the Cosmo Compress motion JPEG codec option (which works in conjunction with the IndyVideo, Indigo2 Video, and Galileo Video video I/O) is shipped as part of the cosmo option product. Runtime support for the Impact Compress motion JPEG codec option (which works in conjunction with Impact Video) is shipped as part of the impactcomp option). 13.1 Audio Codecs The following software audio codecs are bundled with the Digital Media Execution Environment in IRIX 6.3 and later: + ITU G.711 mu-law/A-law speech codec + ITU G.722 speech codec + ITU G.726 speech codec + ITU G.728 speech codec + GSM speech codec + DVI ADPCM codec + MPEG-1 audio codec (see "MPEG-1 Audio/Video Codec" section below) + Federal Standard 1016 CELP codec + DV Audio (DIF) Tools like SoundPlayer(1) and MediaPlayer(1) may be used to play back sound or movie files which contain compress audio data encoded using the above standard compression schemes. MediaConvert(1) and dmconvert(1) may be used to convert to/from these various encoded formats. 13.1.1 Awarer, Inc MultiRate Audio Codec The Digital Media Execution Environment includes built-in support for a high-fidelity audio codec from Aware,Inc called the MultiRate codec. This codec offers a lossless mode which provides approximately 2:1 or 3:1 data compression for CD-quality audio sample data. To run applications that use Aware,Inc MultiRate codec technology on a given Silicon Graphics system, you must purchase a FlexLM license from Silicon Graphics. An Aware codec license will allow you to play/record AIFF-C files which contain MultiRate-encoded data by invoking sfplay(1) or soundplayer(1) for playback and sfrecord(1) for recording. The license will enable conversion to/from AIFF-C files which contain MultiRate data via dmconvert(1) or MediaConvert(1). See the online man page Aware(5) for an overview of the Aware MultiRate compression technology available to developers and end users. 13.2 Image Codecs 13.2.1 Changes and Additions This section lists changes/additions to the image codecs between the IRIX 6.2 and IRIX 6.3/6.4 releases. + Indeo encoding: Intel Indeo compression (a scheme commonly used with AVI movie files and sometimes used with QuickTime movies) is now supported. Tools like MediaConvert(1) and dmconvert(1) can be used to create Indeo-encoded content. + No license required for Cinepakr Video encoding: Cinepak (also called "QuickTime Compact Video") compression is now bundled with the IRIS Digital Media Execution Environment. MediaConvert(1) and dmconvert will now create QuickTime Cinepak movies without a license. + Improved software JPEG codec: The performance of the standard software JPEG codec included in the Digital Media Execution Environment has been improved for IRIX 6.3 and 6.4. + Realtime JPEG codec on O2 systems: The O2 image processing/compression engine provides support for motion JPEG encode and decode. Realtime encode/decode at resolutions up to NTSC, PAL, CCIR601/525, and CCIR601/625 are supported. See the section of "O2 Realtime JPEG Codec" below. 13.3 Realtime JPEG Codec for O2 Workstations The Silicon Graphics O2 workstation family includes integrated support for realtime memory-to-memory JPEG encode and decode at resolutions up to NTSC, PAL, CCIR 601/525, and CCIR 601/625. The compression/image processing engine is a shared system resource, so realtime encode/decode performance is not guaranteed when the engine is being shared between applications or being used to encode/decode multiple JPEG streams simultaneously by a single application. 13.3.1 Known Problems and Workarounds + Restrictions on image dimensions: The realtime JPEG codec provides support for encoding/decoding images which have height/width dimensions that are multiples of 8. For other image sizes, the system falls back to the standard software JPEG codec. 13.4 Cosmo_Compress_JPEG_Codec The Cosmo Compress option for Indy and Indigo2 enables realtime motion JPEG capture from video and playback to video on those systems. (The product does not provide a realtime memory-to-memory JPEG codec capability like the capability offered by the built-in image processing/compression engine in the O2 workstation.) Driver and Compression Library software support for the Cosmo Compress is provided separately in the cosmo product which ships along with the Cosmo hardware. See the cosmo release notes for information about bug fixes, new features, and known problems specific to the Cosmo JPEG codec. 13.5 MPEG-1 Audio/Video Codec 13.5.1 What is MPEG? MPEG is a set of standards for digitally coding video and audio. The name is derived from Moving Pictures Experts Group, which is the technical committee of ISO/IEC (the International Organisation for Standardisation and the International Electrotechnical Commission) responsible for developing these specifications. Several standards have been developed, targeted for different applications. MPEG-1 encodes non-interlaced material and is optimized for single-speed CD-ROM bitrates (about 1.5 Mbps). MPEG-2 handles interlacing and is intended for applications at higher bitrates (4 Mbps or greater) like studio-quality TV. MPEG-4 is in its early stages and is targeted for very low bitrates that may be useful for videophone and other applications. (MPEG-3 was intended for HDTV/ATV but was merged with MPEG-2). Below we summarize the components of MPEG-1. This standard specifies the syntax for three types of bitstreams : video, audio, and systems. + Video : Compression utilizes transform coding and motion estimation, which attempt to remove spatial and temporal redundancies in the original image sequence. Image dimensions up to 4096 by 4096 pixels and various frame rates up to 60 Hz are specified (field information is not defined in the video bitstream), with bitrates up to 105 Mbps allowed. + Audio : Compression is based on subband coding, which divides the input into different frequency bands and allocates bits across frequencies based on perceptual importance. Mono and stereo sources are supported at sampling rates of 32, 44.1 and 48 KHz, and allowable bitrates range from 32 to 448 Kbps. Three layers of encoding are specified : Layers I, II, and III. Generally speaking, the higher layers provide better compression (lower bitrates for the same audio quality) at the expense of greater computational complexity. The higher layers are also supersets of the lower layers in the sense that a Layer III decoder must be able to decode an audio bitstream of any layer, and a Layer II decoder must be able to decode bitstreams from Layers I and II. + Systems : The systems specification defines how the compressed audio and compressed video bitstream are multiplexed; no additional compression is performed. This layer serves to packetize and interleave the compressed audio and video data, along with timestamp information and decoder buffering requirements. Up to 16 video and 32 audio streams may be multiplexed in a single systems stream. For more details on the MPEG standard, see the man page mpeg(4). 13.5.2 MPEG Support in IRIX 6.3 The software MPEG codec included in Digital Media Execution Environment 6.3 implements a subset of the MPEG-1 standard indicated below. (Subsequent references to MPEG in these release notes assume MPEG-1 unless otherwise specified.) + Video : - encoded width min=16 max=4080 pixels - encoded height min=16 max=4080 pixels - bit rate min=100K max=4.5M bits per second + Audio : - layers I, II + Systems : - video streams 1 - audio streams 1 - pack size min=500 max=10000 bytes - bit rate min=150K max=5.0M bits per second 13.5.3 Changes and Additions since IRIX 6.2 + No license required for MPEG audio/video encoding. The MPEG-1 audio/video encoding software included in dmedia_eoe is now available on all systems. The command-line tool dmconvert(1) and the graphical tool mediaconvert(1) may be used to create MPEG-1 audio, video, or systems files from other input formats (QuickTime, AVI, AIFF, WAVE, etc). 13.5.4 Bug Fixes in IRIX 6.5.4 + BUG 673369 - Some Octane systems with the Impact compression option card installed may panic on power up if they have been off for more than 4 hours. The driver does not allow sufficient time for the controller to complete reset processing. The reattach routine now waits for a longer period of time after the bus reset before attempting any GIO bus transactions. + BUG 672908 - clDecompress hangs with single frame and Impact Compression. This happens when hardware interleaving is turned on. When interleaving is turned on for every 2 fields of compressed data you get back only 1 frame of uncompressed data. Low level routines did not account for the halving in the number of received frames. This has been fixed in this release. + BUG 650934 - dmplay fails on ip22 w/ impact compression. One of the Bug fixes to deal with single frame compression did not propogate to the ip22/ip28 device driver. Now dmplay works on IP22/IP28
back to top

Supported Media File Formats 14. Supported Media File Formats The Digital Media Execution Environment includes shared libraries (DSO's) which implement read/write support for a variety of standard digital media file formats. These file formats can be created and read by any applications which are based on these DSO's, including the standard digital media commands and tools which are shipped with dmedia_eoe.sw.base and dmedia_eoe.sw.tools. The shared libraries which implement support for digital media file formats are: + libaudiofile.so: the Audio File Library (installed from dmedia_eoe.sw.lib). + libmoviefile.so: the Movie File Library (installed from dmedia_eoe.sw.lib). + libifl.so: the Image Format Library (installed from ifl_eoe). See the release notes for the "Image Format Library Execution Environment" for more information. Digital media tools for converting between different sound, movie, and image file formats include dmconvert(1) and mediaconvert(1). There are a variety of digital media tools included in dmedia_eoe which provide recording, playback, import/export, and editing support for the sound and movie formats supported by libaudiofile.so and libmoviefile.so. 14.1 Supported Sound File Formats These sound file formats are supported by the Digital Media Execution Environment: + AIFF and AIFF-C files (.aiff or .aifc) + Sun/NeXT sound files (.au or .snd) + Microsoft RIFF WAVE files (.wav) + MPEG-1 layer I, II audio bitstreams (.mpg) + Berkeley/IRCAM/CARL sound files + Sound Designer II files (.sd2) + Creative Labs SoundFont 2 files (.sf2) + SampleVision files (.smp) + Creative Labs VOC files (.voc) + Audio Visual Research files (.avr) + Amiga IFF/8SVX files (.iff) In addition, several tools including soundplayer(1) and dminfo(1) provide support for reading standard MIDI files. 14.2 Supported Movie File Formats These movie file formats are supported by the Digital Media Execution Environment: + QuickTime files + AVI files + DIF (Raw DV) files + MPEG-1 video bitstreams + MPEG-1 systems bitstreams + SGI Movie files 14.2.1 Changes and Additions This section lists changes/additions to the movie file format support in the digital media execution environment between the IRIX 6.3/6.4 releases and the IRIX 6.5 release. + DIF (Raw DV) files Read/Write support added for 6.5 and later.
back to top

Digital Media DSO's 15. Digital Media DSO's A number of shared execution libraries (DSO's) are included in the dmedia_eoe images. The directory /usr/lib contains versions of these DSO's for use by o32 applications, and the directory /usr/lib32 contains versions for use by n32 applications. The subsystems dmedia_eoe.sw.lib and dmedia_eoe.sw32.lib install the o32 and n32 versions of the base DSO's respectively. The subsystems dmedia_eoe.sw.plugins and dmedia_eoe.sw32.plugins install the o32 and n32 versions of special-effects plug-in modules. This section briefly describes the functions of the different digital media DSO's. 15.1 Audio Library The Audio Library provides an application software interface to the audio I/O device capabilities of the system. 15.1.1 Changes and Additions + In IRIX 6.4, and starting with IRIX 6.3, the Audio Library is now a DSO rather than a static library. It is installed as /usr/{lib,lib32,lib64}/libaudio.so.1. Applications which were linked with libaudio.a in previous releases will continue to operate properly in IRIX 6.4. 15.2 Video Library The Video Library provides an application software interface to the video I/O device capabilities of the system, as well as access to special video hardware paths such as video to screen or screen capture to memory on some systems which have these features. The Video Library DSO is installed as /usr/{lib,lib32}/libvl.so. 15.3 Digital Media Library and Image/Audio Converters The Digital Media Library provides core functionality for digital media applications. Functionality in IRIX 6.4 includes: + Image conversion management: a software framework for managing software image codecs and realtime memory-to- memory image codecs which rely on hardware acceleration. + Audio conversion management: a software framework for managing audio data conversion including compression/decompression, sampling rate conversion, sample data format conversion, and channel matrix conversion. + Digital media buffer system: a software framework which allows memory buffers containing compressed or uncompressed image data to be moved with copying between various subsystems including video I/O ports, software or realtime memory-to-memory image compressors, and OpenGL. + Software color space conversion: the Digital Media Library includes optimized code for performing high quality color space conversion in software. + Digital media networking: a network-independent framework which allows the interchange of DMbuffers between processes, whether on the same machine or on machines connected by a network. 15.3.1 Digital Media Library DSO's The Digital Media Library is composed of the following DSO's: + /usr/{lib,lib32}/libdmedia.so: The Digital Media Library. + /usr/{lib,lib32}/dmedia/imageconverters/*.so: Image converter modules for software image codecs and realtime memory-to-memory hardware-accelerated codecs. These modules are loaded at runtime by the Digital Media Library when required by an application. They are not loaded directly by applications. + /usr/{lib,lib32}/dmedia/audioconverters/*.so: Audio converter modules for audio compression/decompression, audio sampling rate conversion, and audio data format and channel matrix conversion. These modules are loaded at runtime by the Digital Media Library when required by an application. They are not loaded directly by applications. + /usr/{lib,lib32}/libcl.so: The "old" Compression Library. This library provides the developer interface and software framework for several image codecs and a few audio codecs in IRIX 6.2 and earlier releases. The full IRIX 6.2 functionality is supported in IRIX 6.4 and future releases for backward compatibility with existing applications. Low level image codec modules in the "imageconverters" directory are now shared by libdmedia.so and libcl.so. + /usr/{lib, lib32}/libawareaudio.so: Aware,Inc audio compression framework DSO. There are no routines in this DSO that are visible to developers. This DSO is used internally by libcl.so for interfacing to the MPEG and Aware, Inc MultiRate codecs only. + /usr/{lib, lib32}/libaudioutil.so: In earlier releases, this library included audio conversion and compression operations. In IRIX 6.3 and IRIX 6.4, audio conversion operations have all been centralized in the Digital Media Library, libdmedia.so. As a result, libaudioutil.so is now a symlink to libdmedia.so. + /usr/{lib,lib32}/libdmnet.so: This library provides a standard API for moving Digital Media buffers between applications on the same machine or applications separated by a network. 15.3.2 Changes_and_Additions + IRIX 6.5.14 adds support for decompressing QuickTime Planar RGB movie files which have a depth of 8, 24, and 32 color and 8 bit grey scale. + IRIX 6.5.12 added support for decompressing Microsoft RLE. This will only work with data which was previously generated using Quicktime(*). + The DMNet API for Digital Media Networking is an addition to IRIX 6.5. It provides a standard API on all IRIX platforms for interchanging Digital Media buffers between processes, whether they are on the same machine or separated by a network. 15.4 Movie Library The Movie Library provides core library software for reading, writing, editing, and playing back standard movie file formats (QuickTime(*), AVI, MPEG-1 video/systems bitstreams, SGI Movie). Starting with IRIX 6.3, the Movie Library is now composed of a set of DSO's rather than a single static library. Applications which were linked with libmovie.a in previous releases will continue to operate properly in IRIX 6.4. 15.4.1 Movie Library DSO's The Movie Library is composed of the following DSO's: + /usr/{lib,lib32}/libmoviefile.so: The Movie File Library. This DSO implements file read, write, edit support. It is a high-level library which builds on top of the image compression/conversion and audio compression/conversion functions in the core Digital Media Library. + /usr/{lib,lib32}/libmovieplay.so: The Movie Playback Library. This DSO provides high level playback and transport control functions to applications. It is built on top of the "lower level" functions provided by the Movie File Library, and uses OpenGL and the Audio Library for rendering synchronized audio/image output. + /usr/{lib,lib32}/dmedia/movie/*.so: Movie display ports and rendering modules loaded internally by the playback engine, libmovieplay.so, as required at runtime. Applications do not load these modules directly. + /usr/{lib, lib32}/{libmovie.so,libmovieGL.so}: These are now "stub" DSO's which simply make available all the public symbols from libmovieplay.so and libmoviefile.so. They exist only to provide backward compatibility with link lines for applications that were previously built using "-lmovie" or "-lmovieGL". In IRIX 6.4, it is strongly recommended that developers explicitly link with "-lmovieplay -lmoviefile" or just "-lmoviefile" as appropriate. 15.4.2 Changes and Additions + IRIX 6.5.14 adds to the support for reading QuickTime None movie files which have a depth of 1, 2, 4 and 8 bit color and 4,8 bit grey scale. + IRIX 6.5.14 adds support for reading QuickTime BMP movie files which have a depth of 1, 2, 4, 8, 24 and 32 color and 4, 8 bit grey scale. + IRIX 6.5.14 adds support for reading QuickTime Planar RGB movie files which have a depth of 8, 24, and 32 color and 8 bit grey scale. + IRIX 6.5.12 adds support for reading of 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 24 bit uncompressed AVI files. Originally only 32 bit uncompressed AVI files were supported. + IRIX 6.5.12 adds support for reading of Microsoft RLE compressed AVI files. + IRIX 6.5.12 adds support to allow reading of compressed header Quicktime(*) movie files. + As of IRIX 6.3 the Movie Library is no longer statically linked into applications. It is now composed of two high-level DSO's, libmoviefile.so and libmovieplay.so, which contain the public movie file and playback API's, as well as several of rendering and playback modules loaded internally by libmovieplay.so. 15.4.3 Bug Fixes Bug 610006: An internal Movie Library data structure and the algorithm that managed its growth could fragment the application memory heap and cause poor performance during movie capture. The data structure and algorithm have been corrected in Irix 6.5.1m. + 15.5 Audio File Library The Audio File Library, /usr/{lib,lib32}/libaudiofile.so, provides core library software for reading and writing a variety of sound file formats (see the "Supported Media File Formats" chapter of these release notes). The Audio File Library is a high-level library that makes use of the lower-level audio compression and conversion functions offered by the core Digital Media Library. 15.5.1 Changes and Additions + Addition of support for 32- and 64-bit floating point AIFF-C files. + Addition of support for AIFF-C files which use IMA4:1 compression, and full compliance with Apple, Inc. AIFF-C compression specifications. 15.6 MIDI Library The MIDI Library, /usr/{lib, lib32}/libmd.so, provides an application interface to the IRIX MIDI I/O system built. This system offers support for timestamped MIDI I/O through serial ports, and for delivery of interprocess MIDI events (eg, play back a MIDI sound file using ISoundPlayer(1) and trigger music synthesis on a second process, the software MIDI synthesizer). 15.6.1 Changes and Additions + The MIDI Library has not changed since IRIX 6.2. 15.6.2 Known Problems and Workarounds + In IRIX 6.4, MIDI I/O through the serial ports is fully functional for the Onyx2 workstation and also for Origin2000 with the optional base audio option. In IRIX 6.3, MIDI I/O through the serial ports is not functional on the O2 workstation. It is our hope that we will be able to provide this functionality for IRIX 6.3 in the form of a patch. (*) QuickTime is a registered trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.
back to top

Digital Media Commands 16. Digital Media Commands The digital media subsystem dmedia_eoe.sw.base contains a number of command line utility programs. This chapter describes changes, additions, and bug fixes to these commands. 16.1 Digital Media File Conversion Commands The following digital media file conversion and information utilities are included in dmedia_eoe.sw.base: + dminfo(1) display info about sound, movie, image files + dmconvert(1) general purpose sound, image, movie converter tool + sfinfo(1) display info about sound files (link to dminfo) + aifcresample(1) sampling rate converter (link to dmconvert) + aiff2aifc(1) convert AIFF to AIFF-C (link to dmconvert) + aifc2aiff(1) convert AIFF-C to AIFF (link to dmconvert) + aifccompress(1) compress AIFF(-C) data (link to dmconvert) + aifcdecompress(1) decompress AIFF(-C) data (link to dmconvert) + sfconvert(1) sound file converter (link to dmconvert) + makemovie(1) movie file converter (link to dmconvert) dmconvert is a general-purpose command-line tool for converting between a variety of digital media file formats. It can be used to convert between different movie file formats (e.g. SGI movie, QuickTime, MPEG-1 systems bitstream, MPEG-1 video bitstream), different sound file formats (e.g. AIFF, AIFF-C, MPEG-1 audio bitstream), and sequences of images in various formats (e.g. SGI image, JFIF, TIFF, GIF, FIT). dminfo is a command-line utility program which displays detailed information about the audio and/or image tracks in a digital media file (sound file, movie file, or image file). The tool also displays general information such as the total playing time for the file. 16.1.1 Changes and Additions since IRIX 5.3 + dmconvert(1) is a new general-purpose digital media file conversion utility which replaces aifc2aiff(1), aiff2aifc(1), aifccompress(1), aifcdecompress(1), aifcresample(1), sfconvert(1), and makemovie(1). The older programs are still available for backwards compatibility. + dminfo(1) is a new utility program which displays various attributes of the audio and/or image data stored in a digital media file. It replaces aifcinfo(1), sfinfo(1), and makemovie -D. The older programs are still available for backwards compatibility. 16.1.2 Changes and Additions This section lists changes/additions to the digital media conversion commands between the IRIX 6.2 and IRIX 6.3/6.4 releases. + dmconvert includes the ability to convert to the AVI movie format. + dmconvert includes support for the Intel Indeo 3.2 compressor. + dmconvert no longer requires an SGI license to enable MPEG-1 audio, MPEG-1 video, or Cinepak encoding. These capabilities are now bundled with the base IRIX 6.3 and 6.4 software releases. + dmconvert includes support for additional sound file formats: Creative Labs SoundFont 2, SampleVision, Creative Labs VOC, Audio Visual Research, Amiga IFF/8SVX. + dmconvert includes support for several additional audio compression schemes: CCITT G.726, CCITT G.728, GSM 06.10, IMA DVI ADPCM. 16.2 Known Problems and Workarounds + dmconvert does not yet handle transfer of inst chunk information for any formats other than AIFF and AIFF-C. Similarly, many miscellaneous chunk types are not transferred between all available file types. dminfo also fails to parse much of this information in the other file formats. There is sample code in /usr/share/src/dmedia/soundcommands showing methods of doing these things. 16.3 Audio Recording and Playback Commands The following sound utility commands are included in dmedia_eoe.sw.base: + sfplay(1) sound file playback command + playaifc(1) installed as a symbolic link to sfplay + playaiff(1) installed as a symbolic link to sfplay + sfrecord(1) sound file recording command + recordaifc(1) installed as a symbolic link to sfrecord + recordaiff(1) installed as a symbolic link to sfrecord + passthru(1) user-level audio in to audio out utility The IRIS Digital Media Development Environment 6.4 (shipped as part of IRIS Development Option 6.4) includes complete source code for all of the above commands. 16.3.1 Changes and Additions This section lists changes/additions to the sound commands between the IRIX 6.2 and IRIX 6.3/6.4 releases. + sfrecord is a new general-purpose command-line tool for recording sound files. The older playaifc and playaiff invocations are retained for backward compatibility. sfrecord supports a number of output formats: WAVE, Sun/NeXT, raw sample data, and the CCITT G.726, CCITT G.728, GSM, MPEG-1 audio, and DVI ADPCM codecs. 16.4 Video Utility Commands The following video I/O utility commands are included in dmedia_eoe.sw.base: + videoin(1) display video input in a window + videoout(1) send a portion of the screen to video out + vidtomem(1) single video frame capture to memory + memtovid(1) single video frame output from memory + vintovout(1) user-level video in to video out utility + vlinfofP(1) display Video Library configuration information The IRIS Digital Media Development Environment 6.4 (shipped as part of IRIS Development Option 6.4) includes complete source code for all of the above video utility commands. 16.4.1 Changes_and_Additions This section lists changes/additions to the video commands between the IRIX 6.2 and IRIX 6.3/6.4 releases. + Each of the above video commands is supported on the built-in video I/O subsystem for video-equipped O2 workstations. 16.5 Video Disk Recording and Playback Commands The following audio/video disk recording and playback commands are included in dmedia_eoe.sw.base: + dmrecord(1) record motion JPEG video with audio to disk + dmplay(1) play back motion JPEG video with audio from disk dmrecord is a command-line tool for hard disk video recording. It records an SGI movie file which contains a JPEG-compressed video track and, optionally, a synchronized audio track. dmrecord supports real-time video recording to disk through ev1 video (Galileo Video, Indigo2 Video, Indy Video) and the Cosmo Compress JPEG video compressor. Starting with IRIX 6.3, dmrecord also supports real-time recording to disk using the built-in audio/video input ports and built-in realtime JPEG encoding capabilities of the O2 workstation. By default it produces QuickTime movies using a new format, which is not playable using the previous version of dmplay. It can however be instructed to produce SGI movies in the old format. Starting with IRIX 6.3 for O2 R10000, dmrecord can also produce movies by capturing the images on the monitor screen. dmplay is a command-line tool for hard disk video playback. It plays back an SGI movie file which contains a JPEG- compressed image track. By default, dmplay uses the Cosmo Compressor JPEG decompressor to decode the image track in real-time. The decompressed video output from Cosmo is passed through the ev1 video device and is displayed in a video window on the screen. dmplay supports synchronized audio playback when video is decompressed using Cosmo. Starting with IRIX 6.3, dmplay also supports real-time playback from disk using the built-in audio/video output ports and built-in realtime JPEG decoding capabilities of the O2 workstation. The O2 memory-based architecture allows decompressed video to be passed directly to the graphics framebuffer in main memory for display to the screen, either by itself or simultaneously with display to video. This version of dmplay can play both SGI movies of the old format and the QuickTime movies of the new format. dmplay also supports playback in a graphics window using software JPEG decompression. In this mode, video playback is non-real-time, and audio playback is not supported. The IRIS Digital Media Development Environment 6.4 (shipped as part of IRIS Development Option 6.4) includes complete source code for dmplay and dmrecord. 16.5.1 Changes and Additions This section lists changes/additions to the digital media recording and playback commands between the IRIX 6.2 and IRIX 6.3/6.4 releases. + dmrecord now supports synchronized audio/video capture on video-equipped O2 workstations using the built-in memory-to-memory realtime JPEG encoding capability of the system. + dmplay now supports synchronized audio/video playback on the O2 workstation with display to screen and or video out using the built-in memory-to-memory realtime JPEG decoding capability of the system. (Display to video out is only available on video-equipped systems.) 16.5.2 Changes and Additions This section lists changes/additions to the digital media recording and playback commands between the IRIX 6.3 and IRIX 6.3 for O2 R10000 releases. + dmrecord now can produce JPEG movies by capturing screen images. 16.5.3 Bug Fixes + dmplay now performs the zoom option correctly. + The performance of dmplay is much improved for both graphics and video display. 16.6 Synchronized Audio/Video Realtime Uncompressed Disk Recording and Playback Commands The following synchronized audio/video uncompressed realtime disk recording and playback commands are included in dmedia_eoe.sw.tools: + avcapture(1) realtime capture command + avplayback(1) realtime playback command The IRIS Digital Media Development Environment 6.5 (shipped as part of IRIS Development Option 6.5) includes complete source code for all of the above commands.
back to top

Media Player Tool 17. Media Player Tool MediaPlayer (invoked from the command line as mediaplayer) is a graphical tool that allows you to play back movie or sound files. Movie files can be created using MovieMaker, MediaConvert, dmconvert(1), or MediaRecorder (see below). Sound files may be created by the above tools, SoundEditor or SoundTrack (multiple track sound editor). See the man page mediaplayer(1) or MediaPlayer's on-line help for more information. The directory /usr/share/data/movies contains sample movies, if the subsystems dmedia_eoe.data.movies and/or dmedia_eoe.data.moremovies are installed. There is an SGI movie file, somersault.movie, and a sample QuickTime movie, sampleQT.mov. studio.mps is an MPEG systems stream movie. 17.1 New features in MediaPlayer 4.4.0, released with IRIX 6.5 for O2 + MediaPlayer now supports the playback of other types of media other than movies. This includes sound, MIDI, and still image files. + MediaPlayer now supports the playback of some types of compressed audio embedded in QuickTime movies. (IMA4 and DV-Audio) + MediaPlayer now has the ability to display video to the video out jack at the same time as it is playing to graphics. + MediaPlayer now supports the playback of DIF streams (raw DV data) . + A new command line flag is supported, "-P", which tells the playback engine to start in "Play Every Frame" mode. 17.2 Known Problems and Workarounds This section lists problems in the MediaPlayer software and ways to work around them. + In order to play movies to video out on an O2, the video ouput signal's Output Sync must be set to "Internal". Failing to establish this setting will cause Media Player to hang. To adjust or verify the Output Sync setting, open vcp(1), choose Pro -> Video Output -> Signal Controls. Then from the Video Output- Signal panel choose "Internal" on the Output Sync pulldown menu. + The "-S" command line flag is no longer supported. Use the standard X mechanism using "-geometry +X+Y". + MIDI playback has some problems. If you should encounter problems playing a MIDI file, you may use soundplayer(1) instead. + The current SGI movie format version number is 3. Movies made or edited with IRIX 5.1 or later releases of Movie Maker might not play or might play incorrectly with the IRIX 4.0.5 version of MediaPlayer However, the current version of MediaPlayer plays all versions (1, 2 and 3) of SGI movies correctly. + MediaPlayer does not work correctly over the network. The user interface and images will display on the local machine, but the audio will play on the remote machine. In addition, if you are displaying MediaPlayer from an IRIX 6.2 or later system to an IRIX 5.3 system, you may need to install one of the following patches on your IRIX 5.3 system which fixes an OpenGL problem: number 450, 720, or 926. + MediaPlayer does not support the playback of FIT image sequences in this release. You can work around this problem by using MovieMaker or dmconvert to convert your FIT images to a supported movie format. + If you choose "Play Every Frame" from the "View" menu, audio is disabled while the movie is playing. To restore audio, deselect "Play Every Frame." + For MPEG movies only: the "Copy" command will only provide a still image; it will not provide movie-file or audio-file targets of the selection. + MediaPlayer is not able to play certain MPEG movies where the MPEG information starts at an offset other than 0. For these movies, Movie Player may hang or crash.
back to top

Media Recorder Tool 18. Media Recorder Tool The Media Recorder Tool (invoked from the command line as mediarecorder) is a graphical tool that allows you to record audio files, movie files or still images from the camera or other video source, microphone and workstation screen. Currently, the video capture modes of Media Recorder work on the following hardware: + The O2 workstation + The Octane workstation with Octane Video, Octane Compression, or Octane Personal Video option boards + the Indy workstation, including the Indy Video and Cosmo Compress option boards + the Indigo2 workstation with the Galileo, Indigo2 Video, Indigo2 Video for IMPACT, or Cosmo Compress option boards. Audio capture is supported on all systems with an audio input. See the man page mediarecorder(1) or Media Recorder's on- line help for more information. 18.1 Changes and Additions This section lists changes and additions to Media Recorder since the IRIX 6.2 release. + The Media Recorder Tool replaces the old Capture Tool, found on IRIX 5.x and 6.2. Media Recorder contains many new features, user interface improvements, improved reliability and performance compared to the Capture Tool. The command name capture and its command line syntax have been retained for backwards compatibility, but their use is strongly deprecated. Please refer to the manual page for mediarecorder(1) and update your scripts accordingly. Note that mediarecorder(1) offers new features not supported by capture, which may be accessed only through the new command line syntax. + Media Recorder directly supports motion JPEG compression hardware, such as the Cosmo Compress board and the motion JPEG capabilities built into the O2 workstation. + Media Recorder allows you to record movie files from the workstation screen. Screen recording via software (the X server) is supported on all systems. On SGI systems with optional or built-in video capability, such as the O2 workstation, the Indy/Indigo2 with the Cosmo Compress option, or the Octane with Octane Personal Video, you can record QuickTime movies with motion JPEG compression from the workstation screen. + Media Recorder provides greatly improved video recording performance and audio-video synchronization as compared to the Capture Tool. + Media Recorder is now capable of using multiple disk volumes at once to achieve higher rate captures, given the appropriate hardware. See the mediarecorder(1) manual page for more details. + Media Recorder can also take advantage of IRIX scheduling priorities to achieve better video capture. See the mediarecorder(1) manual page for more details. + Media Recorder fully supports the IRIX Interactive Desktop(TM). Newly recorded media files appear as icons right inside the Media Recorder display. You can rename them or drag them to other applications. You can also choose the directory in which to record files by dragging a desktop folder into the icon pocket in the Media Recorder display. + Media Recorder now allows you to choose audio and video jacks directly from within the application. The Audio and Video control panels can still be used to set signal timing (NTSC vs. PAL) and to adjust audio input levels. + There is a new user interface for selecting regions of the screen, which is improved over that provided by the Capture Tool. + You can now set a time delay before recording starts, allowing you to grab screenshots of menus and other mouse-sensitive tasks. + The user interface for choosing movie parameters has been greatly improved compared to the Capture Tool. You can now choose from a list of "smart presets" appropriate to specific recording tasks. You can still control all aspects of the capture, if you so choose. + Media Recorder now supports Copy and Paste to other applications, include Media Maker and Sound Track. + The still image feature now supports several popular formats, including JPEG, GIF and TIFF. You can also view captured images in place, rather than in a separate window. + The audio recording feature now supports AIFF and WAVE file formats. It also supports four-channel and eight-channel recording. + Media Recorder now provides estimates of the amount of time remaining, based upon data rate and free disk space, while capture is in progress. 18.2 Bug Fixes This section lists problems in Media Recorder which have been fixed since the IRIX 6.4 release. + The command line options have been enhanced. You can now specify compression, color packing, and interlacing settings for movie files, specify screen recording options, and direct the tool to record without human intervention. For more details, see the mediarecorder manual page. + There have been several minor user interface improvements. The Clip Bin has been reworked to look and behave more like other desktop media applications such as moviemaker. You can now freely adjust the size of the Clip Bin relative to the viewing area. More prompts have been added in areas to help those unfamiliar with the tool, and Media Recorder now visually highlights the chosen recording mode (movie, image or audio) onscreen. + There are new new menu options to launch external editors, players, conversion and info displays on media files. For more details, see the online user documenation. + Support for Apple's QuickTime Motion JPEG-A format has been included. This Motion JPEG format is compatible with QuickTime running on non-SGI platforms. The SGI Motion JPEG format has been preserved, for compatibility with applications running on earlier releases of IRIX. + Media Recorder's ability to perform data conversions when writing movie files has been enhanced. This allows you to select movie parameters, such as size, color space, interlacing, and compression settings, without regard for the capabilities of your system's underlying video hardware. Media Recorder will take advantage of hardware capabilities, such as color space conversion and Motion JPEG compression, and perform software format conversion only when necessary. + If recording aborts because audio or video was dropped, you will still get a useful media file. Previous versions of the tool would discard the file if audio or video was dropped while recording. + Audio recording and waveform display now uses less CPU time than earlier versions of the tool. + The Movie Settings dialog now accurately displays the dimensions for the final movie file, based upon the current video signal being recorded. + Media Recorder now displays time elapsed as well as time remaining when recording video and audio files. + Fixed startup problems when Media Recorder was invoked multiple times concurrently on systems equipped with video. + Added support for the Octane Personal Video hardware option. + Other minor bug fixes to improve reliability in error situations, and with certain video option boards. 18.3 Known Problems and Workarounds This section lists known problems in Media Recorder. Also, please see the mediarecorder manual page for more usage notes. + Since the system has limited video resources, it is best to avoid running more than one application that uses video. In particular, you shouldn't run Live Video Input (videoin from the command line) at the same time as running mediarecorder. Nor should you attempt to run two instances of mediarecorder both capturing video at once. + When switching to quarter sized video, it is possible to make the window so small that the buttons overlap one another. To work around this problem, make the window larger. + It can take up to a second for video to start or stop recording after you press the Record button. + If you completely fill the disk while recording a movie, you often cannot get a usable movie file. This is because there is insufficient temporary disk space available to create the final movie file. To work around this problem, set up your scratch disks on a different drive or filesystem than the one which will contain the final movie file. Alternately, you can avoid the practice of recording video right up until the moment the disk is full. + If you are creating JPEG compressed movies on O2, and you customize the capture "Task Settings" from the "Tasks -> Show Task Settings" menu, then you must take care to ensure that the "Advanced Options -> Interlacing" pop-up menu is set to "Two Fields". Otherwise, mediarecorder may crash or hang when it performs its "post-processing" operation. A movie that is captured with "Two Field" interlacing may be converted to non-intlaced "One Frame" format by using moviemaker or dmconvert.
back to top

Movie Maker Tool 19. Movie Maker Tool MovieMaker (invoked from the command line as moviemaker) is a graphical tool for creating and editing multitrack QuickTime movies. Movies can include clips from QuickTime, AVI, DIF (Raw DV data), MPEG and SGI movie files, images and audio files. On-line help is available describing in detail how to go about creating and editing movies. 19.1 New features in MovieMaker 4.4.0, released with IRIX 6.5 for O2 + MovieMaker sports a clip-oriented interface. Individual pieces of media appear as a separate items in the timeline and clip bin. + MovieMaker now has a "Print To Videotape" feature. + MovieMaker now supports importing DIF files (raw DV data). + MovieMaker now supports importing some types of movies with compressed audio. + MovieMaker now supports multiple layers. Layers at the top of the timeline appear in front of those lower in the timeline. All audio tracks are mixed no matter where they appear in the stacking order. + MovieMaker now supports a single level of Undo. + MovieMaker now supports drag-n-drop to and from the clip bin. + MovieMaker now supports the use of Audio and Video filters for adding flair to your compositions. Of special note is the "Custom 3D Effect..." accessible from the "Effects" menu. + MovieMaker now has a built-in titling facility for adding text and drawing annotations to your movie. + MovieMaker also has a synchronized audio recording feature that lets you add voice-over annotations to your movie while playing the movie. 19.2 Bug Fixes Bug 610693: As of Irix6.5.1m, uncompressed frame-based YUV 422 movies will be fully compatible with QuickTime 3.0 running on other platforms (Mac, Windows). (Note that this fix applies to the SGI movie library and all dmedia tools; for more information, please see the dmedia_dev release notes on the SGI movie library.) 19.3 Known Problems and Workarounds This section lists problems in the MovieMaker software and ways to work around them. + MovieMaker only supports editing within the QuickTime file format. When opening an SGI, AVI, DIF, or MPEG file formats, you will be prompted to import that file into a new QuickTime file. In order to get the resulting movie back into one of these file formats, you can use the "Export As..." menu command. + MovieMaker may appear to copy and paste the wrong number of frames. This is because QuickTime files can have variable image durations. It may appear that the selection did not contain the correct number of frames after it was pasted. The user should verify that the duration of the pasted selection is the same as the duration of the original selection. + Movie files will grow in size when you add data to a movie while editing, either by using the "Import..." command, or by using the "Paste" command. This happens even if you do not explicitly save the movie file. To reduce the size of your movie file, use the "Save As..." command to save your movie into a new filename, and any unreferenced data will not be included in the new file. + MovieMaker creates temporary files in /usr/tmp (specified in the TMPDIR environment variable) during edit and cut and paste operations. These files can sometimes reach a large size. If MovieMaker exits abnormally, these temporary files may not be deleted from /usr/tmp. You may need to check your /usr/tmp and remove these files manually. + We do not recommend that you use MovieMaker over the network. Just say no. + If you are inserting images or another movie that have a frame size larger than the current movie setup size, the images will automatically be scaled to the movie setup size. + When working with a composition of different sized tracks, filtered information from larger sized tracks will be added to smaller tracks. To workaround this problem, run filters on the smaller sized tracks first or save the file and reopen it into moviemaker before running additional filters. This is especially noticeable when running filters which make use of texture mapping, like the "Custom 3D Effect..." (a.k.a "FxBuilt Filter"). + The "Picture-In-Picture" by default maintains the aspect ratio of the track when resizing. To scale nonuniformly, hold down the shift modifier key. Experts may want to specify the exact transformation by expanding the dialog. + Occasionally, the timeline display will create new "lanes" when repositioning clips. To move a clip to a new lane without changing its start time, hold down the shift key while moving the clip. If there are a number of empty lanes, use the "Set Number of Timeline Lanes..." to a new number. + When running a video filter on an image clip, the icon in the clip bin changes to a video icon. This is correct behavior as there are now more than one image in the clip (introduced by the filter). When the filter is removed (by selecting and deleting from the clip bin), the icon will revert back to the image icon. + Setting the background color occasionally does not take effect until the current time has changed. Also, the background color may not be saved as part of the movie file under certain conditions. + Although the fonts used in the titler are specified in the X resources, not all fonts are currently supported. Changing to a new font may cause the application to exit abnormally. + Applying filters to multiple clip selections is not suggested. Unusual results may occur. You should apply filters to only one clip at a time.
back to top

Media Convert Tool 20. Media Convert Tool Media Convert (invoked as mediaconvert(1)), is a digital media file conversion tool that provides a simple user interface for creating movie, audio, and image files from other movie, audio, and image files. Media Convert replaces the tool ``Movie Master'' which was introduced in the IRIS Digital Media Tools version 5.4 (WebForce 1.0). For more details, consult the manual page, or the on-line help which is available from within the tool. In addition, you may want to refer to the documentation for dmconvert(1), since Media Convert invokes dmconvert for the actual file conversion operation. Most new features and bug fixes for dmconvert will also apply to Media Convert. 20.1 Supported Conversion Operations This release of the tool supports the following file conversion operations. sound file --> sound file image sequence --> image sequence image sequence --> video-only movie video-only movie --> video-only movie video-only movie --> image sequence audio/video movie --> sound file audio/video movie --> video-only movie audio/video movie --> image sequence audio/video movie --> audio/video movie sound file + video-only movie --> audio/video movie sound file + image sequence --> audio/video movie 20.2 Supported File Formats The following partial list of file formats is supported. For a complete list, see the manual page for dmconvert(1). Sound file formats: AIFF AIFF-C NeXT/Sun WAVE MPEG-1 layer I, layer II audio bitstream Movie file formats: QuickTime (Photo, Animation, Video, Cinepakr compression) MPEG-1 video bitstream MPEG-1 systems (audio/video) bitstream SGI Movie AVI (Indeor, Cinepakr compression) -> input-only Image file formats: SGI rgb image JFIF GIF TIFF FIT PhotoCD -> input-only 20.3 Consolidation of Tools In IRIX 6.4 as in IRIX 6.2, mediaconvert and dmconvert have been enhanced to provide a superset of features that were previously available from numerous older programs. Users of the older programs will find the following backwards compatibility support. The graphical tools, soundfiler(1) and movieconvert(1), are now symbolic links to mediaconvert. The command-line tools, aifc2aiff(1), aiff2aifc(1), aifccompress(1), aifcdecompress(1), aifcresample(1), sfconvert(1), and makemovie(1), are all still available, but have been re-implemented to internally invoke dmconvert. 20.4 Related Tools MovieMaker(1): Graphical tool for editing movie files. Not primarily intended as a movie conversion tool, however there is an Export Options panel which allows user to set various export file format parameters. Tool supports SGI Movie and QuickTime (including Cinepak) movies. Will not read MPEG movies. 20.5 Known Problems and Workarounds This section lists problems in Media Convert and ways to work around them. + If you are converting a QuickTime movie which contains non-uniform frame durations, Media Convert will always generate a movie with a constant frame rate. Therefore, the size of the output file may increase because Media Convert may duplicate source frames into the output file. To work around this problem, be sure to set the frame rate in the "Video Output Parameters" dialog when you use a QuickTime movie as an input file. + If you specify an SGI movie file as output, the progress indicator bar may show 100% completion, and a delay on the order of a minute may occur before writing the SGI movie file has been completed. + You cannot create a JPEG Cosmo compress movie from a source movie with an odd number of pixels for the height. You will first need to convert the source movie to a movie with an even number of pixels for the height, and then the intermediate movie file can be used to create a Cosmo movie. 20.6 Changes from Previous Media Convert This section lists the changes in the functionality and interface of Media Convert from the versions shipped with IRIS Digital Media Tools 5.4. + The "Open Input File" dialog is now dismissed after a file is selected. + You can directly combine an AIFF audio file with an MPEG video file. + The default output settings for converting to MPEG is MPEG-1, Layer II. 20.7 Bug Fixes This section lists the bugs fixed since the IRIS Digital Media Tools 5.4 version. + It is easier to type in a path name in the input file text fields. + You can now specify input files containing a "#" character in the file name. + Media Convert can accept QuickTime movies which have a non-integer frame rate. + You can now drop a QuickTime movie file with audio tracks into the Audio drop pocket. + The output parameter settings are now "sticky." They remain unchanged until a new input file is specified. + The default name for the output file now gets an automatic suffix corresponding to the output type. + Media Convert no longer prints an error message if Cosmo Compress is not installed. + If Media Convert should run into an error while performing the conversion (running out of disk space, for example), or if the conversion is cancelled before it is completed, the incomplete file is now automatically deleted. + Media Convert handles the error condition if the output file specified cannot be written or created. + Media Convert now warns the user if the output file will be over-written. + Media Convert provides better user feedback if a necessary CODEC license is missing (such as Cinepak or MPEG). + Media Convert works on smaller displays, because the output parameters settings are displayed in a separate dialog box, instead of expanding the Media Convert window. + Media Convert now correctly converts an MPEG movie file into a sequence of image files. + A problem which caused Media Convert to fail to create a JPEG SGI movie format file has been fixed. + Movies created from Cosmo Compress JPEG movies have improved image quality.
back to top

Sound Player Tool 21. Sound Player Tool Sound Player (invoked from the command line as soundplayer(1)) is a Motif application for playing sound and MIDI files. Sound Player supports a variety of file formats including: + AIFF file format (.aiff) + AIFF-C file format (.aifc) + Sun/NeXT Format (.au or .snd) + Microsoft RIFF WAVE Format (.wav) + MPEG-1 layer I, II audio bitstreams + Berkeley/IRCAM/CARL SoundFile + Sound Designer II + Audio Visual Research + Amiga IFF/8SVX + SampleVision + VOC + SoundFont2 + Raw (headerless) sounds + Standard MIDI Files + RIFF MIDI Files This program requires a Silicon Graphics system with digital audio hardware components (Iris Audio Processor) in order to play back sounds. You may provide a soundfile name when invoking Sound Player from the shell. Sound Player loads this file (if it exists) and begins to play automatically. Sound Player supports Standard MIDI File playback. In order to play MIDI files, you must either: + Connect an external MIDI sound module to your workstation using one of the serial ports (together with a Mac serial port to MIDI adapter, commonly called a "dongle") OR + Install the software MIDI synthesizer, a standard element of the Digital Media Execution Environment (software systems: dmedia_eoe.sw.synth and dmedia_eoe.data.synth). For more information regarding configuring the serial ports for MIDI, see the graphical System Manager tool accessible from the Toolchest under the System menu. For more information regarding the software MIDI synthesizer, see the manual page for midisynth(1) and the release notes (Digital Media Execution Environment, Chapter 9). You may customize the appearance of Sound Player by altering its Motif application defaults file, SoundPlayer, in the directory /usr/lib/X11/app-defaults. See your Motif/X11 documentation regarding use of the application defaults file. See the man page soundplayer(1) and Sound Player's on-line help for additional information about the tool. 21.1 Bug Fixes This section lists the bugs fixed since the 6.3/6.4 release. + MPEG Layer 3 files now produce an appropriate error message rather than hanging the application. + SoundPlayer now correctly "chases" all MIDI controller messages when beginning MIDI file playback at arbitrary locations in a file. 21.2 Changes and Additions This section lists changes and additions to Sound Player since the Digital Media Execution Environment 6.3/6.4 release. + Added support for playback of RIFF MIDI (.rmi) files. 21.3 Known Problems and Workarounds This section lists problems in Sound Player and ways to work around them. + No known problems.
back to top

Sound Editor Tool 22. Sound Editor Tool Sound Editor (invoked from the command line as soundeditor(1)) is a Motif application for recording and editing soundfiles that use AIFF format soundfiles. Although AIFF or AIFF-C files may be opened, all files are saved in uncompressed AIFF format. Use the mediaconvert utility to convert soundfiles in other formats to AIFF for use with Sound Editor. This program requires a Silicon Graphics system with digital audio hardware components in order to capture and audition sounds. On systems without audio hardware, the record and play functions will be disabled, but soundfiles may still be viewed and edited. A graphical display of the audio stream data is presented for editing. Familiar word processor-style commands are available for manipulating the audio content. Sound segments can be cut, copied, pasted, or mixed by marking a region with the mouse and invoking the proper command. Additional functions are provided to modify levels and to perform fades and special effects. Sound Editor accepts a command line option, "-nofork", which will force the program to run in the foreground. Without this option, the standard behavior is for Sound Editor to fork and run in the background. Also, you may provide a soundfile name when invoking Sound Editor from the shell. This file, if it exists, will be loaded on startup. Otherwise, the file name will be used for a new file. You can customize the appearance of Sound Editor by altering its Motif application defaults file, SoundEditor, in the directory /usr/lib/X11/app-defaults. See your Motif/X11 documentation regarding use of the application defaults file. See the man page soundeditor(1) and Sound Editor's on-line help for additional information about the tool. 22.1 Bug Fixes This section lists bugs which were fixed between the 6.2 and 6.5 releases. + The program is now able to record sound files with a sample bit width equal to 24. 22.2 Changes and Additions The version of Sound Editor included in IRIX 6.5 is the same as the version that was shipped with IRIX 6.3 and 6.4. 22.3 Known Problems and Workarounds This section lists problems in Sound Editor and ways to work around them. + Sometimes, if you paste sound data from another application into Sound Editor, the time-ruler may not get redrawn properly. If you force a redraw of the window by resizing it, the time-ruler will get updated properly. + If all the audio ports are open, and Sound Editor cannot allocate an audio port, Sound Editor may crash. + Under certain conditions, the keyboard accelerators can become disabled. Bringing up the menu containing the desired command usually corrects this situation. + Although the program can open either AIFF or AIFF-C files, there is no way within Sound Editor to export files in a particular format. Use the mediconvert utility program to convert a file to another format. + The cut-and-paste operations do not work correctly between different host machines. To work around this, copy all files to be edited to the same host. + When altering the selected region during repeat play, it is possible for the play region to lag behind the user's input or sometimes play material outside the marked region. This behavior normally corrects itself after cycling through the marked play region.
back to top

CD Player Tool 23. CD Player Tool CD Player, invoked from the command line as cdplayer, allows you to play audio CDs on an IRIX-supported SCSI CD-ROM drive. The audio is played through the IRIX audio hardware. CD Player also lets you copy digital audio data from CD directly across the SCSI bus to a disk file in the computer's file system. Any such copying is, of course, subject to copyright law. 23.1 Changes and Additions + Starting with IRIX 6.3, The Digital Media Execution Environment subsystem for 6.5 (dmedia_eoe.sw.tools) includes the program cdplayer(1), which provides a number of improvements over its predecessor, cdman. Cdplayer uses the standard digital media look-and-feel and provides much more extensive facilities for moving between tracks and for copying digital audio from CD tracks to sound files on disk. + For IRIX 6.5, the timeline selection operations were changed to match those other digital media desktop tools, notably MovieMaker.
back to top

DAT Manager Tool 24. DAT Manager Tool DAT Manager, invoked from the command line as datman, allows you to play audio DAT tapes on an IRIX-supported SCSI DAT drive. The audio is played through the IRIX audio hardware. DAT Manager is a recorder as well as a player. It can record data coming from the IRIX audio hardware or from a file in the computer's file system to DAT. The tapes recorded and played by DAT Manager are compatible with commercial DAT recorders. DAT Manager also allows you to capture digital audio data directly from a tape across the SCSI bus to a disk file. The IRIX Digital Media Noship subsystem for 6.5 (dmedia_noship.sw.dat) includes source code for a command- line tool, dodat, which allows you to copy tracks between an audio DAT and sound files on disk. The version of DAT Manager included in IRIX Digital Media Tools 6.5 is the same as the version that was shipped with the 6.2 release. PLEASE NOTE that as of 6.5, DAT audio is no longer officially supported. 24.1 Known Problems and Workarounds This section lists problems in the DAT Manager software and ways to work around them. + DAT Manager does not let you cue to an index on a tape. + The only nonaudio data DAT Manager currently records is program number and absolute time code. This means that DAT Manager does not record program time. There is currently no way to renumber the programs on a tape or to erase a program number. + DAT Manager displays uncorrected frame numbers when playing back a tape recorded with SMPTE time code in place of running time. + When recording to a file from DAT Manager, the sampling rate stored in the AIFF-C file header is the rate of the most recently played portion of the DAT. This means that given a DAT that has programs recorded at different sampling rates, DAT Manager might create a file with the wrong sampling rate if you have just played a program with a different sampling rate from the program about to be recorded. Workaround: When recording to disk from a DAT that contains programs with different sampling rates, use separate AIFF-C files for the different programs. When you are about to record a DAT program to disk that has a different sampling rate from the last program you played, first play a portion of the new program. Then, rewind to the beginning of the program and begin recording to an AIFF-C file. + The music catalog function used by CD Manager is not currently implemented for tapes because so few of them have the table of contents necessary to uniquely identify a tape.
back to top

MIDI Keyboard Tool 25. MIDI Keyboard Tool The MIDI Keyboard application (invoked from the command line as midikeys) is a graphical user interface which displays a three-dimensional piano keyboard. Using the mouse or computer keyboard key shortcuts, you may play notes on this piano, which functions as a MIDI controller. Midikeys sends MIDI Note-On, Note-Off, and controller events, over the MIDI interface selected in its MIDI->Interface menu. This allows you to play the internal Software MIDI Synthesizer midisynth(1) without need for an external MIDI keyboard. Midikeys can also monitor MIDI activity on any single MIDI channel. If the menu item Options->MIDI Input Animation is toggled, midikeys will automatically press and release its keys that correspond to Note-Ons and Note-Offs received on the selected channel. The MIDI synthesizer and its related applications, including this tool, are installed from the optional subsystem dmedia_eoe.sw.synth. To enable General MIDI synthesis, it is also necessary to install the subsystem dmedia_eoe.data.synth, which contains a full set of General MIDI presets for the synthesizer. See the midikeys(1) and midisynth(1) man pages for additional information. 25.1 Bug Fixes + Key-downs triggered by the mouse button are now released correctly even if the mouse leaves the midikeys window. 25.1.1 Known Problems and Workarounds + If the mouse is moved slowly over the keyboard with the left button depressed, certain key transitions will generate an oscillation of key-up and key-down events between the keys. This is usually not a problem under normal usage. + Not all combinations of computer keyboard key shortcuts may be played simultaneously, i.e., the number of chords playable via the computer keyboard shortcuts is limited. This is a computer keyboard hardware limitation, and there is no workaround other than to use an external MIDI keyboard.
back to top

Compression Viewer Tool 26. Compression Viewer Tool The compview(1) tool provides a graphical user interface which allows you to view an original image and the result of compressing the image with either the SGI software JPEG compressor or the Cosmo Compress JPEG compressor (if installed). Compview also provides statistical information about the differences between the original and compressed images.
back to top

Sound Track Audio Tool 27. Sound Track Audio Tool SoundTrack (invoked as soundtrack) is a graphical application for recording and assembling multi-channel audio projects. SoundTrack supports non-destructive editing and processing with multiple levels of undo/redo for up to 32 tracks of audio. The program can also import and export a wide variety of soundfile and sample formats. Cut-Copy- Paste functions allow easy transfer of data to and from other digital media applications such as Movie Maker. While running SoundTrack, the help menu provides access to detailed information about creating and editing audio projects. Also, please see the manual page (soundtrack) for a list of program features and basic techniques. 27.1 Changes and Additions + The selection semantics for importing multi-channel (e.g. stereo) files has been improved. If no tracks are selected, SoundTrack adds two new tracks to the end of the track list. If one track is selected, the first channel is written to that track then SoundTrack inserts any additionally required track after the selected track. + Previewed movie information is now saved with along with the rest of the project information. + Users now have the option of importing the audio from a movie when the movie is opened. 27.2 Known Problems and Workarounds This section lists problems in the IRIX 6.5 version of the software and ways to work around them. + The program does not handle running out of disk space very well at this time. Be sure to set the project directory ('File | New') to a drive with plenty of space for recording and processing. To help deal with space issues, the status line at the top of the main application window displays both the available disk space as well as the amount of space taken up by the current project. + If the program is invoked from a directory where the user does not have write permission, it will attempt to reset the working directory to a write-able temporary file directory. In this case, the user should invoke 'File | New' prior to any recording or editing operations in order to set the project directory properly. + During recording and editing, SoundTrack creates temporary files in the current project directory with the filename prefix "_temp". If SoundTrack is not exited normally, these temporary files may still exist in the project directory. You may need to remove these files manually. Hint: saving the project file regularly during a session helps to manage errant temp files as well as prevent the loss of data in the event your work is interrupted. + When playback/recording starts, the audio input port which reads the record signal is synchronized with the output port which is playing back the other tracks. After this initial sync-up, no additional sync alignment is performed. In general this will not be a problem; however, if there are drop-outs in either of the audio port streams, they will no longer be synchronized. This situation occurs when other system processes interfere with the audio thread's access to the cpu. In the future, we anticipate implementing periodic sync correction beyond just the initial startup. + This revision of the program does not handle automatic monitor operations such as muting a track while it's being recorded over or passing the input signal through to the output while recording. To hear the input signal, select the monitor option in the audio control panel. Note that if you are recording from a microphone (not line) input, it's best not to monitor the signal through a nearby speaker since this can cause noisy feedback.
back to top

Sample Sound, Movie, and Music Files 28. Sample Sound, Movie, and Music Files The directory /usr/share/data/sounds/prosonus contains a collection of music and sound files created by Prosonus especially for your Silicon Graphics computer system. See the man page prosonus(5) for more information about these sound files. The subsystem dmedia_tools.data.movies, which is marked for default installation, includes two sample movie files. The movies are installed in the directory /usr/share/data/movies. + somersault.movie is a movie file in the SGI Movie format. The image data in the movie was compressed using the SGI MVC1 compression scheme. + sampleQT.mov is a sample QuickTime movie. The image data in the movie was compressed using the QuickTime Animation compression scheme. The subsystem dmedia_tools.data.moremovies, not installed by default, includes the sample MPEG-1 systems bitstream file studio.mps. This is an MPEG-1 movie which includes both an audio track and a video track. The size of the file is about 10 MB, and the playing time is about 59 seconds. Movie Player can be used to view the movie. The audio and video tracks are decompressed using the standard MPEG-1 audio and video decoder engines which are included in IRIS Digital Media Execution Environment 5.5. The movie was created by compressing sequence of rendered frames (SGI image files) and a soundtrack (AIFF file) using the new Media Convert. The original animation sequence was created using a variety of applications running on Silicon Graphics computer systems. If you wish to create similar MPEG movies, you can obtain a Silicon Graphics MPEG Encoder License which unlocks the software MPEG-1 audio/video compressors included with IRIS Digital Media Execution Environment 5.5.
back to top

Recipes 29. Recipes This chapter lists some tasty recipes for you to enjoy. 29.1 Kung Pao Chicken This classic Chinese dish is a zesty blend of chicken, peanuts and vegetables in a spicy sauce. 29.1.1 Ingredients 1 Chicken, about 2 1bs (1 kg) or 1 lb (450 g) Chicken Breasts 8 pieces Dry Hot Red Pepper, 1 piece about 3" (7.5 cm) long 1/2 cup (120 ml) Unsalted Peanuts (optional) 1 tsp Ginger, chopped 1 Green Pepper, chopped into 1 inch (2.5 cm) squares 1/2 White Onion, chopped into 1 inch (2.5 cm) squares Marinade: 1 1/2 tablespoons Cornstarch 1 1/2 tablespoons Cold Water 1 tablespoon Soy Sauce For Cooking: 5 cups (1200 ml) Peanut Oil Seasoning Sauce: 2 tablespoons Soy Sauce 1 tablespoon Chinese Rice Wine 1 tablespoon Sugar 1 teaspoon Cornstarch 1/2 tablespoon Chinese Black Bean Sauce 1 teaspoon Sesame Oil 29.1.2 Procedure 1. Remove all bones from chicken, cut into 1 inch (2.5 cm) cubes, add water, cornstarch and soy sauce. Stir evenly in one direction and soak for one half hour. 2. Chop green pepper and onion, set aside. Chop ginger, set aside. Wipe clean, remove tips and seeds of dry red pepper, cut into 1 inch (2.5 cm) long pieces, set aside. Mix ingredients for seasoning sauce, set aside. 3. Heat oil in wok. Fry peanuts until golden. Remove and let cool. 4. Fry chicken in boiling oil for a half minute. Remove chicken and drain off oil from wok. 5. Return 2 tablespoons oil to wok. Heat until very hot, then add ginger and red pepper. Fry until red pepper turns black (watch out for pepper fumes), then add onions and green pepper. Stir fry for one minute. 6. Return chicken to wok, stir quickly, then add seasoning sauce. Stir until thickened and heated thoroughly, then turn off heat. (Be careful not to heat sauce too thoroughly, as it can caramelize). Add the peanuts (deep fried or roasted). Mix well and serve immediately with steamed rice. 29.2 Tiramisu This famous Italian dessert delicately layers cookies, chocolate and coffee with a rich blend of cream and Italian Mascarpone cheese. It is sure to wow the guests at your next dinner party. This recipe was contributed by Sean Yamamoto (seany@sgi.com). 29.2.1 Ingredients 100 g Mascarpone cheese 1 Egg, separated 1 tablespoon Sugar 0.25 liter Heavy Cream Espresso (1 espresso cup per 5 people), cold Lady's fingers cookies Bittersweet chocolate and cocoa, grated (powder) Vanilla extract Optional: Liqueur (brandy, cognac or rum) Layers of chocolate or cocoa (with the two other layers). 29.2.2 Procedure 1. In mixing bowl combine the mascarpone, the sugar and the egg yolks. Mix well. 2. In another bowl whip the heavy cream with the vanilla. 3. Whip the egg whites into soft peaks (separately). 4. Fold together the mascarpone mixture, whipped cream, and egg whites. 5. Pour the coffee (no sugar) in a bowl and steep the lady's fingers. 6. In the serving dish make a layer of cookies, then a layer of the cream. 7. Repeat until there are 3 or 4 layers (until the cream is finished). 8. At the end, sprinkle some chocolate or cocoa. 9. Put in the refrigerator (minimum 4 hours).
back to top

FX Builder Tool 30. FX Builder Tool FX Builder (invoked as Custom 3D Effect from moviemaker under the Effects menu) is a graphical tool for creating 3D filters for movies. Imported objects include IRIS ImageVision Library image files and Open Inventor 3D model files. On-line help is available describing in detail how to go about creating and editing filters. 30.1 Known Problems and Workarounds This section lists problems in the FX Builder software and ways to work around them. + Importing movies is not functioning in this release. No workaround.
back to top

Disk Striping and Performance Testing Utilities 30. Disk Striping and Performance Testing Utilities The new tools diskalign and diskperf are tools to assist in the configuration and performance testing of high performance striped logical volumes. There are extensive manual pages with describing the usage of these utilities. Extensive tuning tips and tricks are also documented in the manual page. 30.1 Known Problems and Workarounds This section documents known problems and workarounds. + Currently you must use the -c (create) option when doing write testing using filesystems with diskperf. No workaround.
back to top

Synthesizer Editor 10. Synthesizer Editor The Synthesizer Editor (invoked from the command line as syntheditor(1)) provides a graphical interface for creating, editing, auditioning, and saving software MIDI synthesizer (midisynth(1)) presets. Syntheditor communicates with midisynth via MIDI system exclusive messages, and has its state updated by MIDI sysex messages returning from midisynth. All this communication takes place over the MIDI port "Software Synth" in real time: MIDI instruments may be edited as they are playing back to allow instantaneous feedback for all changes. Syntheditor "listens" on on MIDI channel at a time. Syntheditor reads and writes synthesizer preset files, which are plain ASCII text files containing a complete specification of a MIDI instrument or instrument combination for a given MIDI channel. When a preset file is loaded into syntheditor, midisynth will be instructed to load the same preset file so that immediate playback and modification may be done. A complete description of these preset files is in the synthpreset(4) man page. The MIDI synthesizer and its related applications, including this tool, are installed from the optional subsystem dmedia_eoe.sw.synth. To enable General MIDI synthesis, it is also necessary to install the subsystem dmedia_eoe.data.synth, which contains a full set of General MIDI presets for the synthesizer. 10.1 Known Problems and Workarounds + The preset envelope editing panel is somewhat clumsy due to the lack of a drag-and-release interface. No workaround. + The editor may become confused if given a preset name on the command line if that preset (and its associated samples) takes a significant amount of time to load. Workaround: Start the editor with no filename arguments, and then load the preset using the Open menu command.
back to top


home/search | what's new | help